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  • Results 1 to 17 of 17

    Thread: Copper pipe?

    1. #1
      Enrgizerbunny is offline Member
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      Copper pipe?

      I am looking at the prospect of adding an upper "pond" for summer plants that would look like a garden fountain. Similar to the picture, but larger. Could I use copper or brass for the output? I searched for it on here but didn't find an answer. I have koi and goldies, but I don't care about the Goldies.

      This is purely theory right now but the rest would be PVC.
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    2. #2
      coolwon is offline Senior Member
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      Replace with 316 stainless steel.

      Coppers and brasses, etc are not recommended in the Koi environment.
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      batman is offline Senior Member
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      Under normal PH and alkalinity ranges most likely you'll not cause a problem. It is common practice and advice to avoid copper in a koi pond.

      You can get creative and paint PVC pipe to look like distressed copper. Krylon and Rust-Oleum both have plastic compatible spray paints. Several colors and finishes available including hammered metals.
      Last edited by batman; 01-21-2022 at 01:34 AM.
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      cottagefog is offline Senior Member
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      " Could I use copper or brass for the output? I searched for it on here but didn't find an answer."

      To answer your question, and from what I have read your koi should be very safe with your section of copper pipe.

      Unless I am missing that article, or study on the dangers of copper PIPE to koi, and just the small section you plan on using I personally would do the same

    5. #5
      coolwon is offline Senior Member
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    6. #6
      icu2's Avatar
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      It seems if copper pipes leached substantial amounts into the water carried in them, would they still
      be used in residences today or be a worry for the millions of homes with them already installed?
      Most what I've seen is a concern when water sits for long periods of time in the pipes, which for a pond
      return doesn't seem like a problem.
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    7. #7
      cottagefog is offline Senior Member
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      Here in the United States there are over 2 million homes that use water softeners. Averaging 40 pounds of salt a month for a normal family. (running thru copper pipes)

      I am sure it is nowhere near the 3% you would use in a pond, but I would still take the salt argument with a grain of salt ;- )

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      batman is offline Senior Member
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      It's a very controversial subject. Some believe very very low amounts impact koi health and decease immunity during stress periods. They also claim koi are more susceptible. Others think the low levels have no impact and it takes extreme conditions for a reaction and substantial release. Aquascape has sold 1000s of the IonGen system for algae growth and apparently it hasn't caused koi and goldfish die offs.

      The same controversy exists for treated wood types.
      Last edited by batman; 01-21-2022 at 12:50 PM.
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    9. #9
      batman is offline Senior Member
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      Ponds use sodium chloride and water softeners that regenerate with salt leave a small amount of sodium in the water and no salt.

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      Last edited by batman; 01-21-2022 at 01:02 PM.
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    10. #10
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      I guess I used a poor analogy. I still would have no problem using small section of copper pipe in a pond setting!

    11. #11
      batman is offline Senior Member
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      If one is worried about copper pipe use they could use PVC on the outlet and split a copper pipe section and slide it over. This wouldn't eliminate but could cut the copper to pond water exposure drastically.
      The real Batman wears polyester! Don't be fooled by the plastic imposter.

    12. #12
      coolwon is offline Senior Member
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      Lead pipes

      Lead in the gas.

      Lead in the paint

      Looked into a brush compartment.

      The brushes were suspended on copper tubes

      Verdigris on the pipes, made a picturesque patch.

      Supposedly not poisonous.

      Looks scary in a Koi pond environment.
      Find more about Weather in Durban, ZA

    13. #13
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      Thank you for all the responses. If I end up building it, there's a lot to consider!

    14. #14
      SimonW is offline Senior Member
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      No idea why worry. All the water pipes used in the tap water system in Sweden are made of coppar.

    15. #15
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      Quote Originally Posted by icu2 View Post
      It seems if copper pipes leached substantial amounts into the water carried in them, would they still
      be used in residences today or be a worry for the millions of homes with them already installed?
      Most what I've seen is a concern when water sits for long periods of time in the pipes, which for a pond
      return doesn't seem like a problem.
      In the USA, municipal water supplies are generally buffered to maintain PH above 7.0 for the reason of not leaching the copper pipes and solders. This was why there was a problem in Flint Michigan, they changed water supply sources and failed to buffer up the PH, so the lead began leaching from an acidic PH water supply. Unless you never test PH (and buffer up when necessary), and never do water changes, copper supply lines and the short stub in the fountain should be fine. Most of the concerns with copper have to do with pond heating and using copper heat exchangers where a good portion of the water is recirculated through long lengths of copper every hour... and this is during winter mostly, when maintenance might be reduced (although if you're spending the dough top heat your pond, you're probably maintaining it like the other 3 seasons).
      Koiphen member since 05-13-2004

    16. #16
      coolwon is offline Senior Member
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      Quote Originally Posted by SimonW View Post
      No idea why worry. All the water pipes used in the tap water system in Sweden are made of coppar.
      You worry you die

      You don't worry you still die!

      So why worry.

      Last edited by coolwon; 01-29-2022 at 06:26 AM.
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    17. #17
      Enrgizerbunny is offline Member
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      Quote Originally Posted by danzcool View Post
      In the USA, municipal water supplies are generally buffered to maintain PH above 7.0 for the reason of not leaching the copper pipes and solders. This was why there was a problem in Flint Michigan, they changed water supply sources and failed to buffer up the PH, so the lead began leaching from an acidic PH water supply. Unless you never test PH (and buffer up when necessary), and never do water changes, copper supply lines and the short stub in the fountain should be fine. Most of the concerns with copper have to do with pond heating and using copper heat exchangers where a good portion of the water is recirculated through long lengths of copper every hour... and this is during winter mostly, when maintenance might be reduced (although if you're spending the dough top heat your pond, you're probably maintaining it like the other 3 seasons).

      My pond is actually buffered with whole oyster shells in the filter and my morning pH readings have always been in the 8 range. Sounds like I should be fine with real copper or brass if I want it.

      Thanks for all the help.

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