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  • Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
    Results 41 to 46 of 46

    Thread: In ground Liner against dirt or build a retaining wall?

    1. #41
      stevek is offline Supporting Member
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      Quote Originally Posted by Shanescaife2@gmail.com View Post
      Still digging! Had to remove a large stump, so that set us back. Taking a break for Christmas and new year. Hope to start again after the holidays. Agree Batman most bog filters will clog or muck up. In nature this would turn to soil extending a stream, river, or filling and ending the bog.
      The gardens along the sides of the rill will filter solids each 2ftx4ft section will be boxes just under the medium surface. This way each section can be lifted out and cleaned. Solids collected and returned as compost. A second swirl filter will be used to collect solids before entering the grow station. After the swirl filter the water will go through an aeration box and then a possibility a bio filter. Solids will also be collected after the grow station before returning to the pond.
      I would love to use baked clay as a medium but the cost would be higher. Anyone know where I can buy it in bulk? I think that would be like over 600 ft.≥. I think that would top like $8,000 +-?
      Thanks
      There is a product called Turface MVP which is baked clay . Used for drying out sports fields , and wet areas of landscape. Costs about $20 per 50 pound bag, but I bet can be bought cheaper in quantity . Check your local irrigation supply company.

    2. #42
      Paul Sabucchi's Avatar
      Paul Sabucchi is offline Senior Member
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      The owner of the fancy aquaponic place I mentioned earlier told me always get baked clay for agricultural use as the ones for other purposes may contain heavy metals or other unwanted substances...just passing on the advice.

    3. #43
      batman is offline Senior Member
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      Check to see if expanded shale is available locally.

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      The real Batman wears polyester! Don't be fooled by the plastic imposter.

    4. #44
      Shanescaife2@gmail.com is offline Junior Member
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      I agree, better price. But I live in NJ and shipping from Texas would be costly. Iíll see if I can find a local supplier. Maybe split the system, vegetables in shale other plants in gravel.
      Last edited by Shanescaife2@gmail.com; 12-24-2021 at 10:13 AM.

    5. #45
      batman is offline Senior Member
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      It's used in lightweight concrete. Check out sites selling concrete and masonry products. Plant sites are too low volume and high priced.
      The real Batman wears polyester! Don't be fooled by the plastic imposter.

    6. #46
      janie12 is offline Junior Member
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      Wonderful project. My knowledge about cinder block is that, When cores of the blocks are retaining ground water, then these thin walls offer little resistance against hydrostatic water pressure and the cinder blocks leak. Water easily passing through the cracks in the mortar joints and pushing through the pores.

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