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  • Results 1 to 11 of 11

    Thread: Algae control

    1. #1
      Richard Holub's Avatar
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      Algae control

      I have been keeping Koi since 2006 but this year is the first time that the string algae is out of control. I kn ow, I know, I know...it all has to do with the filtering system and number of Koi. I have not yet hooked up my UV Sterilizer as a test but was wondering if there is a brand of "algae-get-it-out"
      formula on the market. I am looking at "AlgaeFix" and "Total Pond Clear". Any suggestions or warnings? Do they work? Thanks in advance.

    2. #2
      icu2's Avatar
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      I've used 3% hydrogen peroxide, which is the cheap stuff you can find in quart bottles at Walmart for
      less than $1. I dose it with 1 quart per 1000 gallons and it seems to keep it semi under control. The stuff
      that doesn't die I just manually remove.
      It seems some years it'll appear, some years none. UV lights won't work on it, just fwiw. I know a few swear by AlgaeFix and
      I bought a gallon but then heard many with horror stories, so I gave it to my neighbor who has a small pond (and algae) but no fish.
      Not worth the risk for me personally. One of the many threads:

      https://www.koiphen.com/forums/showt...effect-on-fish
      --Steve

    3. #3
      pondfishguy is offline Senior Member
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      I'm 100% with icu2 on this. I've cleaned up ponds with buckets full of string algae using hydrogen peroxide. I use a garden sprayer and apply it both above and below the waterline. You can see the algae start bubbling immediately. After 2 days if there is still remaining I treat again. The dead/dying algae puts a real load on the filter so backwash frequently during treatment.

      You can also get test strips to measure the residual concentration after treatment. For large ponds I buy it at 35% concentration from hydroponics stores and dilute before using.

    4. #4
      cottagefog is offline Senior Member
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      I use Baquacil oxidizer, 27% hydrogen peroxide. 1 cup per 2000 gallons of pond water. Apply every other day to control string algae.

      It was $18.99 a gallon and I purchased it from the local pool supply

    5. #5
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      Quote Originally Posted by cottagefog View Post
      I use Baquacil oxidizer, 27% hydrogen peroxide. 1 cup per 2000 gallons of pond water. Apply every other day to control string algae.

      It was $18.99 a gallon and I purchased it from the local pool supply
      That's what I use.

      Other Sites Sale prices are our everyday prices.
      Vice President Oregon Koi and Watergarden Society


    6. #6
      Elsonkoi is offline Member
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      I had string algae problems too.it's like i have to clean my skimmer twice a day!!!!
      Here is what I did. 3ppm potassium permagnate bypass filter every two weeks. I did three doses(one month and half month) , my string algae are under control now. by the way, I never use UV.
      you may hear people say don use potassium permangnate its dangerous blablabla. i mean fish farmers ain't stupid. its been used for hundreds years. 3PPM is very safe dosage, not only it oxidize string algae but also kill parasites and bad bacteria in your water. meanwhile it provides mineral manganese to your water too which is a very important mineral for fish to grow. but you need to use hydrogen peroxide to clean the brown water from oxidizing.

      http://www.koiknowledge.com/faq-pota...manganate.html
      Last edited by Elsonkoi; 2 Weeks Ago at 10:48 AM.

    7. #7
      True Blue is offline Member
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      I, too, am having algae problems this year. About 2 months ago, we replaced our UV system which had been non-functioning for about 2 years. The algae problems are a little bit of string algae, but it's mostly black, presumably dead algae which accumulates in my skimmer basket and pump strainer. I backflush/do small water changes 2x week. The replacement of the UV made the water much clearer (it's amazing how much of a difference that makes, but it's only cosmetic), but didn't seem to have an effect on the amount and nature of the algae accumulating in the baskets. Backflushing doesn't really flush much algae, and it appears most of it is caught by the baskets. It's weird, because last year we didn't have nearly the amount of algae as this year and there were fewer water changes and I only backflushed about once a week. I'm in So Cal and it was a pretty warm winter with very little rain, wondering if that has something to do with it.

    8. #8
      kimini is offline Senior Member
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      Quote Originally Posted by Richard Holub View Post
      ... I know, I know, I know...it all has to do with the filtering system and number of Koi...
      That's true, in addition to about another dozen variables, and I don't think anyone knows what those variables are. Many of us have it come and go, and in my case, it was really bad the first couple years after redoing the pond. As others use, I also used the 27% H2O2, and it really works, turning the algae a brownish yellow. This year there hasn't been any, and barely any carpet algae, either. Floating algae, however, is always around, kept at bay by a 120V UV lamp.
      Last edited by kimini; 1 Week Ago at 12:28 PM.

    9. #9
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      So a few questions, current having green water. So using peroxide or what ever is just treating the symptom and not the cause. Can you hear the nurse in me? lol. Also how does using Hydrogen peroxide work with free cell algae. I've dosed the entire pond with PP in the past but unfortunately I built a monster pond. So neutralizing the PP takes like 30 gallons of Hydrogen Peroxide. I know my main problem is direct sunlight.
      Last edited by Craigger7; 1 Week Ago at 09:52 PM.

    10. #10
      jrlaubin's Avatar
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      there is a powered form of peroxide call green clean, easier to apply to large ponds. works on both single cell blooms and string algae

    11. #11
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      ADDENDUM: Using Bentonite-Type Clay

      I have read in a different forum from MikeM who posted 3 days ago, and below is the quote of what he did. Interesting that using Bentonite-Type Clay can deter string algae and control it. You guys/gals might want to try it, especially if you have Bentonite-Type Clay lying around.

      Quote Originally Posted by MikeM
      ADDENDUM: Using Bentonite-Type Clay

      Years ago, I posted above that I had not observed any significant impact on string algae growth from using powdered clay as an additive. That is no longer true.

      In the Spring of 2020, while forced to stay at home due to the Covid-19 lock-down restrictions, I finally got around to cleaning out the garage. (I was really bored!) In the course, I came across a huge container of 'koi clay' I had acquired in bulk at some point years ago. I do not recall getting it. There must have been a 'going out of business' sale or some such for me to acquire so much of the stuff. I decided I might as well use it. It was early April, about the time of year when the string algae in my pond usually begins to have a growth spurt. Following the usual weekly filter cleaning and water change, I placed approximately 6 cups of clay in a bucket, mixed well with water, and slowly added it to my 12,500 gallon (U.S. gallons) pond. This was a lot more clay than is generally recommended on packages of the stuff sold to koikeepers, but I was wanting to use it up. When the clay started settling in the bucket, I mixed in more water and continued slowly adding it. The goal was to have it completely muddy the water. I accomplished that much... to the point that the koi more than a foot or two below the surface were visible as only vague shapes. After a few hours, the clay cleared. During the course of the week, there was a substantial increase in the amount of algae glarf captured in the mechanical filter stages. I continued this practice through early June, the usual end of the annual seasonal algae bloom in my pond. Over the following weeks, there was less algae glarf than normal. There was no outbreak of string algae in 2020. Over the summer months, I continued using the clay, but at the reduced rate of 2-3 cups per week following the weekly 30-40% water change. When the cool season arrived in December, I ceased using the clay. I still had not used up all I had on hand.

      This Spring, I started using the clay again. I followed the same practice I had in 2020.... Weekly applications of about 6 cups to 12,500 gallons, perhaps a bit less on occasion. Once again, there was initially a substantial increase in the amount of algae glarf captured in the filters, followed by a substantial reduction below normal. It is once again early June and again there has been no seasonal outbreak of string algae, at least nothing approaching what I had come to consider normal for my pond.

      As I posted above concerning the use of clay to control algae, there are several possible factors involved that could explain what appears to be a negative impact on string algae. Bentonite-type clay is known to adsorb ammonia and, to some extent, phosphates. This occurs primarily when the clay is suspended in the water column. When the clay settles, there is greatly reduced surface area exposed for adherence of pollutants. However, the clay particulate settling on the strands of filamentous algae limit light exposure and may interfere with the algae retrieving nutrient from the water column. There are no sufficient studies to give an answer. There are only hints of possibilities to be found in the scientific literature.

      All that said, for two years there has been no noticeable outbreak of string algae in my pond. This is a dramatic change. I cannot say it was due solely to the use of clay, but I cannot identify any other change in practice that might have contributed. What is different is the quantity used. At the rate of a half cup per thousand gallons weekly for 8-9 weeks, followed by a quarter-cup per thousand gallons weekly for 6 months, there was a lot of clay used!

      I still have some left, perhaps enough for another 6 weeks or so. I will then have used up that bulk package that had been pushed to a back corner of the garage. Did it really control the string algae? Was there coincidental factors involved? I do not know. What I do know is that if the powdered clay available was not so expensive, I would definitely continue using it. The idea of paying $4-5 per pound, plus shipping, for 20 and 25 pound packages (double and triple that much for smaller packages) makes me feel like a sucker. It's dirt! But, I'll be thinking about it......
      -=[Sunny]=-

      I have served, I have fought to defends the rights and freedom for all Americans. I am a proud Retired Veteran!

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