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  • Results 1 to 10 of 10

    Thread: Recommended filtration system for a large pond?

    1. #1
      Wook262000 is offline Junior Member
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      Recommended filtration system for a large pond?

      Hi everyone. I currently have a 900 gallon pond with a simple skimmer/waterfall filtration system. Me and the wife love it. Have about 10 small koi in it. Water is crystal clear. However we would like to start building a much larger koi pond to give the koi some room to grow. We are guessing somewhere in the range of 5000-10,000 gallons. Trying to make it as big as possible with a budget of about $10k. What kind of filtration system do I need to run a bigger pond like that? Preferably one that doesn’t make to much maintenance as gives me more time to enjoy it lol.

    2. #2
      msegger is offline Senior Member
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      Welcome - for a lesser maintenance dedicated large koi pond that you mention, you could have over $5k wrapped up in filtration pretty quickly. RDFs $2700 on up, sieves $1200 on up, pumps $500 on up, bio filters $500 on up. Good you are looking at your budget first. There was a recent thread. Check it out

      https://www.koiphen.com/forums/showt...ghlight=budget

    3. #3
      Wook262000 is offline Junior Member
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      Thanks for the reply. That was a good thread you pointed me to also. I guess the way I was looking at it was I wanted focus first on designing an easier to maintain, effective filtration system that I could afford and then settle for the size pond it worked with, realizing that most of the cost was in the filtration system and the plumbing, and then the lining. So I guess what I was looking to find out was a good design for a filtration system for an approximate 9k gallon pond. My first thoughts were was a primary circuit filter system of 2 bottom drains gravity feeding to that Seaside PP 35 RDF from SeasideAquatics (which has a max flow rate of 9,250 gph or the PP 20 RDF which has max flow rate of 5800 gph) then pump feeding to a bakki shower over a waterfall. And then a secondary circuit going from a skimmer being pump fed to a moving bed filter and back to the pond through tpr's. Not sure what the flow rate would be on the secondary filter circuit, maybe 2000 to 3000 gph? I have always thought you need to have your filtration system turn over the pond at least once per hour, so I was wondering if a design like that would be sufficient to maintain a 9k pound both mechanically and biologically? I am not looking necessarily for a maintenance free filtration system just not one the I have to be cleaning every single day.

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      Kathy is offline Member
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      We have a 6000 gal turtle pond with 2 bottom drains and skimmer that gravity feed a rdf with uv to a large anoxic filter that's pumped back to the pond via tpr and waterfalls. For us, this set up is very low maintenance and water parameters are spot on. Picture of the pond before I finished the sod and fencing, and a picture of the anoxic filter with 70 - 9 to 10" biocenosis baskets.Name:  20170910_175308.jpg
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      Last edited by Kathy; 3 Weeks Ago at 08:24 PM.

    5. #5
      Wook262000 is offline Junior Member
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      Thanks Kathy. That's a beautiful pond, love the turtles too. I haven't thought about an anoxic filter, I don't know much about them but that is definitely something I will have to think about and consider using.

    6. #6
      icu2's Avatar
      icu2 is online now Administrator ~ WWKC Treasurer
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      Quote Originally Posted by Wook262000 View Post
      Hi everyone. I currently have a 900 gallon pond with a simple skimmer/waterfall filtration system. Me and the wife love it. Have about 10 small koi in it. Water is crystal clear. However we would like to start building a much larger koi pond to give the koi some room to grow. We are guessing somewhere in the range of 5000-10,000 gallons. Trying to make it as big as possible with a budget of about $10k. What kind of filtration system do I need to run a bigger pond like that? Preferably one that doesn’t make to much maintenance as gives me more time to enjoy it lol.
      Welcome and thanks for joining Koiphen!

      I think the fact that the RDF price tag didn't give you sticker shot is a good sign.
      I like at least 1x per hour turnover rate, and 45 min is even better. Personally I'd try to get a RDF that
      can handle all the egress points in the pond... BD's, skimmers, etc. Putting the skimmers on another
      circuit will work but will add to the maintenance routine. I leave the baskets in my skimmers so I do
      have to empty them regularly... but I'm retired and I don't mind it. If I'm going on a trip and won't be
      home I simply remove the baskets and let it run straight to the RDF. I don't do it all the time because I
      find the larger leaves can partially block the waste port on mine and make a mess. It's better than the
      skimmers baskets filling up and restricting water when not home, but if I'm here I prefer catching leaves
      (and frogs/salamanders) before they reach the RDF. The RDF has 2 ports for pumps so even if I was to
      lose a pump, the system would still operate till I was able to fix it.

      A RDF to a shower filter is the best setup I've used so far.

      I'm looking forward to watch your build! Enjoy the process!
      --Steve

    7. #7
      Wook262000 is offline Junior Member
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      Thanks Steve. Yeah I think we are going to go the rdf/shower route and tie the skimmer line into the rdf as well. We are still deciding the the size, shape and layout of the pond in the yard, so that will affect the size of the liner and rdf we end up buying. Finishing up some other landscaping projects around the house first, so I guess we won't break ground for it for another month. I'll be sure to post pictures here and ask the questions as they come! Thanks.

    8. #8
      BeyondKoi's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by icu2 View Post
      Welcome and thanks for joining Koiphen!

      I think the fact that the RDF price tag didn't give you sticker shot is a good sign.
      I like at least 1x per hour turnover rate, and 45 min is even better. Personally I'd try to get a RDF that
      can handle all the egress points in the pond... BD's, skimmers, etc. Putting the skimmers on another
      circuit will work but will add to the maintenance routine. I leave the baskets in my skimmers so I do
      have to empty them regularly... but I'm retired and I don't mind it. If I'm going on a trip and won't be
      home I simply remove the baskets and let it run straight to the RDF. I don't do it all the time because I
      find the larger leaves can partially block the waste port on mine and make a mess. It's better than the
      skimmers baskets filling up and restricting water when not home, but if I'm here I prefer catching leaves
      (and frogs/salamanders) before they reach the RDF. The RDF has 2 ports for pumps so even if I was to
      lose a pump, the system would still operate till I was able to fix it.

      A RDF to a shower filter is the best setup I've used so far.

      I'm looking forward to watch your build! Enjoy the process!
      Agree with Steve that you should tie them all to the RDF to keep it simple. However, keep in mind that if both the Skimmer and the DBs are connected to the RDF, the flow on the BDs will be more dominant and skimmer flow will be slow, so make sure that you run the 4 inch for the skimmer, Don't do 3" or 2" you won't get much flow thru the skimmer. Another thing to consider is that if you have a lot of leaves falling in your pond, make sure to have some kind of prefilter/leaf basket to catch the leaves before it reach the RDF. Even the best RDF will have problem with a lot of leaves.


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    9. #9
      kimini is online now Senior Member
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      Quote Originally Posted by Wook262000 View Post
      Thanks Steve. Yeah I think we are going to go the rdf/shower route and tie the skimmer line into the rdf as well. We are still deciding the the size, shape and layout of the pond in the yard, so that will affect the size of the liner and rdf we end up buying. Finishing up some other landscaping projects around the house first, so I guess we won't break ground for it for another month. I'll be sure to post pictures here and ask the questions as they come! Thanks.
      Two other considerations:
      1. Electrical expense, because it's a monthly "forever" factor. Some people live where it's cheap, and others live where the expense dictates everything. I like to tell people planning a pond to work backwards, deciding up front how much they're willing to spend every month for power, then working backwards to see what sort of system it allows. Many people visualize a huge waterfall, only to be brought back to reality when they learn what it costs to push water upward any amount. I redesigned a system, minimizing the lift requirements, and cut costs nearly $150 a month.

      2. RDF waste. It's a very smelly, stinky liquid. Plan ahead about where/how you're going to dispose of it. We run it through a hose to plants in our yard and get away with it because once it dries out, it's pretty much odorless. As a liquid though, sheez. One time I reached into the tray to pull out an algae clump and even after washing my hands three times with soap, my fingers still smelled of it...
      Last edited by kimini; 2 Weeks Ago at 09:00 AM.

    10. #10
      Wook262000 is offline Junior Member
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      Quote Originally Posted by kimini View Post
      Two other considerations:
      1. Electrical expense, because it's a monthly "forever" factor. Some people live where it's cheap, and others live where the expense dictates everything. I like to tell people planning a pond to work backwards, deciding up front how much they're willing to spend every month for power, then working backwards to see what sort of system it allows. Many people visualize a huge waterfall, only to be brought back to reality when they learn what it costs to push water upward any amount. I redesigned a system, minimizing the lift requirements, and cut costs nearly $150 a month.

      2. RDF waste. It's a very smelly, stinky liquid. Plan ahead about where/how you're going to dispose of it. We run it through a hose to plants in our yard and get away with it because once it dries out, it's pretty much odorless. As a liquid though, sheez. One time I reached into the tray to pull out an algae clump and even after washing my hands three times with soap, my fingers still smelled of it...

      Thanks Kimini. I didn't really think that much about the ongoing monthly expense to run the pond too much. But you're right. I found a really good post in here over the weekend about planning your plumbing to help reduce the head and the size of the pumps you needed to get the flow you wanted in your pond. He even went as far as showing you an example of how much you could save per month by planning your plumbing efficiently. Excellent information and greatly appreciated. Here is a link to that post:

      https://www.koiphen.com/forums/showt...imer-Version-2

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