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  • Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
    Results 21 to 25 of 25

    Thread: Thermal shock?

    1. #21
      Russell Peters's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by KTownKoinut View Post
      There's a first.....this should be a gooder...... lol

      I've alwayzz heard there're related, buuut.....enlighten us, Rus.
      You don't get it do you? Did you read what I posted and understand it? I don't think you did. pH of 8.6 and KH of zero. You get that right? If they are related how is that possible? You enlighten me. If they are related then how does this happen? pH 8.6/KH 0

      Now, I do get that KH is used as a buffer to counter the acid produced by the nitrification process but, what I pointed out was that KH is not responsible for the pH you have. It can't be if my KH was zero and my pH is 8.6.

      pH is the result of the concentration of hydrogen ions and hyrdoxide ions in the water.

      The pH of my water in Indiana is 7.2. My calcium hardness is the water is 240mg/L and my total hardness is 260mg/L. So, in water that has NO KH my pH was really high and in water with a very high level my water pH is almost nuetral. Andrea stated that she was puzzled that water with a KH of 143 had a pH of 7.5 and it should have had a pH of 8.3. I countered by asking if there was anything to support what she said about having a KH of 143 that would produce a pH of 8.3. There is nothing as I have just shown. When you use baking soda as a buffer it is not the same as natural buffers in your water so, yes, the results are always predictable and I said that in my comments.

      Since you are the know-it-all come lately please tell us how KH, that occurs naturally in your water, and pH are related. A set amount of KH in your water does not, in my experience deliver a predictable pH. If it did then water with zero KH should have an acid pH and water with very high levels should produce a very high pH. What the water at my two locations has shown is the exact opposite.

      You know there is no such word as "there're" right?
      Last edited by Russell Peters; 4 Weeks Ago at 04:12 PM.
      people like to vehemently defend their purchases and find it incredulous that anything could be better

    2. #22
      Russell Peters's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by ademink View Post
      Should have said I was speaking from my personal experience.

      Sorry.
      Yes, and it is experience with an artificial buffer of KH, which is more predictable.
      people like to vehemently defend their purchases and find it incredulous that anything could be better

    3. #23
      Reeves is offline Junior Member
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      Okay, Iíve got them set up in a 35 gallon tub with a heater, filter, and aeration, seachem ammonia & pH alert tags, I added 5.6oz of aquarium salt. Let it run to stabilize temp and check for leaks overnight and just moved them into it from the 10 gallon tub I had them in initially. When I was moving them it was obvious we have a fungal or bacterial issue that Iím assuming came about because of all the stress involved with this whole ordeal. No pond fish have any signs at all, and these fish were clear of any symptoms when I pulled them out of the pond 2 days ago.

      Looks like fluffy white slimy stuff affecting the fins and tail, with some bits of fins that have fallen off. I canít get a good photo without pulling them out of the tub theyíre in, and Iím trying not to stress them, but I can try if necessary. Water temp is about 62 currently. I can increase if it will help. Iíve used stress coat and stress zyme in addition to the salt. I bought melafix & pimafix so Iíd have something on hand, and there wasnít much else at the pet store. Didnít use either yet, figured Iíd do a little more research and also ask for advice here before I treat. I appreciate any input.

    4. #24
      Reeves is offline Junior Member
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      Quote Originally Posted by RichToyBox View Post
      The wide range test is really only good for giving information on which of the other two test kits is the correct one. The differences in color are not sufficient and the color chart shows too big a range from one color to the next. The most useful test kit for your situation is the high range pH test. API has three pH test kits. One is identified as just pH Test Kit and it is good from pH 6.0 to pH 7.6 with the different color chips indicating generally pH 0.4 steps. The wide range is identified as Wide Range pH Test Kit and it tests the range from pH 5 to pH 9, with the different color chips generally showing a pH 1.0 difference. The third test kit is identified as the High Range pH test kit and it tests from pH 7.4 to pH 8.8, with the color chip differences being pH 0.4.
      Thank you for the explanation! I didnít realize- Iíll get a high range test kit.

    5. #25
      KTownKoinut is offline Senior Member
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      Quote Originally Posted by Russell Peters View Post
      You don't get it do you? Did you read what I posted and understand it? I don't think you did. pH of 8.6 and KH of zero. You get that right? If they are related how is that possible? You enlighten me. If they are related then how does this happen? pH 8.6/KH 0

      Now, I do get that KH is used as a buffer to counter the acid produced by the nitrification process but, what I pointed out was that KH is not responsible for the pH you have. It can't be if my KH was zero and my pH is 8.6.

      pH is the result of the concentration of hydrogen ions and hyrdoxide ions in the water.

      The pH of my water in Indiana is 7.2. My calcium hardness is the water is 240mg/L and my total hardness is 260mg/L. So, in water that has NO KH my pH was really high and in water with a very high level my water pH is almost nuetral. Andrea stated that she was puzzled that water with a KH of 143 had a pH of 7.5 and it should have had a pH of 8.3. I countered by asking if there was anything to support what she said about having a KH of 143 that would produce a pH of 8.3. There is nothing as I have just shown. When you use baking soda as a buffer it is not the same as natural buffers in your water so, yes, the results are always predictable and I said that in my comments.

      Since you are the know-it-all come lately please tell us how KH, that occurs naturally in your water, and pH are related. A set amount of KH in your water does not, in my experience deliver a predictable pH. If it did then water with zero KH should have an acid pH and water with very high levels should produce a very high pH. What the water at my two locations has shown is the exact opposite.

      You know there is no such word as "there're" right?


      Great explanation! ......IDK what allzz the other yiberish is for....

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