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  • Results 1 to 6 of 6

    Thread: GH Question

    1. #1
      ccokeman is offline Junior Member
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      GH Question

      I just rebuilt my pond over the past 15 months and have done a ton of reading on the subject but am still left with the question. Do I need to worry about the GH value of the pond.

      First the specs:
      16 fish between 5 and 18 inches
      1-18 inch
      2-16 inch
      5-12 inch
      5-10 inch
      1-8 inch
      2 5 inch

      Pond is 12 x 10 x 3.5 or just around 3000 gallons with the 3 55 gallon barrels and 150 gallon stock tank for the water fall that holds the lillys.

      3 inch bottom drain to a Cetus Sieve--> 1/3 HP Pump--> Split to a water fall return and Sand and Gravel Filter ( 2200 GPH +/-) -->55 watt UV--> Moving Bed Barrel with 75Liters of K1--> 2nd Barrel with 75 liters of K1 then a return to the pond
      Air pump is a Pond Master AP 100 split between the two moving beds and the 9 inch air diaphragm over the drain.

      My water parameters using an API test kit and strips for the KH/GH ( Drop test ordered) are as follows

      Ammonia: 0 with the test kit and Seachem alert tab
      Nitrite: 0
      Nitrate: 10-20 ppm
      PH: Between 8 and 8.2 in the AM and 8.2 to 8.4 in the evening
      KH: I keep it between 120 to 180 PPM using the API test strips but have a drop test ordered. I am using Baking soda to manage during each water change so that I don;t see a PH crash
      GH: 0

      I guess the question I have is do I need to add anything to bump the GH up with the filters functioning properly based on the testing results I am seeing? The pond has been up and running since July of last year. The water is crystal clear and I have gone through the string Algae phase earlier this year.
      I change about 300 gallons each week when I flush the sand and gravel filter.

      Any thoughts or feedback would be appreciated.

    2. #2
      webted is offline Senior Member
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      Hi Ccokeman:

      Your water parameters look great. There is virtually no point in tracking GH or adjusting anything to change it. It's basically just a measurement of your water minerality.

      The pond is a little small for that number of koi. You'll probably need to move fish out over time if you want to see continued good growth - even with good filtration (which you have) you'll need to change out a lot of water to keep that many fish growing. Keep steady tabs on your KH and nitrate levels - that's where you'll see any problems first. As the fish get bigger and your feeding quantities grow, you'll see nitrates start to increase. That's your clue to either move fish on or increase your water changes. Or start digging...

      Nice job! Any pictures?

      -t

    3. #3
      jcardona1's Avatar
      jcardona1 is online now Senior Member
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      This is what Roddy says about GH. For this reason, I increase my GH using calcium chloride:

      Quote Originally Posted by Roddy Conrad View Post
      Low GH is perfect for a Japanese mud pond where the koi get all the minerals they need from "eating mud" at the bottom of the pond.

      In our backyard koi ponds, however, their food supply frequently does not have an adequate mineral level to maintain color.

      I feed Rangen pellets, for example. They do have mineral content.

      My source water has no measurable GH.

      If I don't add soluble calcium and soluble magnesium to my koi ponds, I can depend on the beni to start fading away on all the kohaku at a GH of about 20 ppm. It happened more than once. If I caught it and noticed it at the start, bumping the GH up brought the beni right back. Wait too long, and there was no beni left to bring back.

      Several of my friends with soft water supplies in back yard koi ponds reported the exact same thing.

      It won't happen in a mud pond.

      It may not happen at low GH with other brands of koi food.

      I like Rangen, the price is right, I know how to make the water right to go with the food. With a more expensive koi food, it may be possible to avoid the issue with extremely low GH.

      I haven't seen the published article myself, yet, by the way. My KOI USA has not arrived yet, they did not send me anything to proof before publishing. I hope it does not contain any actual errors!
      ~ Jose

    4. #4
      RichToyBox's Avatar
      RichToyBox is offline Administrator ~
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      If the GH is truly zero, then there will not be any calcium in the water. Calcium is needed to combine with the carbonates when the bicarb gives up a hydrogen ion to neutralize excess hydroxyl ions. Hydroxyls have a pH of 14. Carbonates have a pH of around 11 or 12, I think, but calcium carbonate is a solid precipitate that removes the carbonates from solution, neutralizing that from the mix and bringing the pH back to the pH of the bicarb, which about 8.3. If the pH is steady as you note, there is probably sufficient calcium for now, but I would try to maintain a value of about 50ppm just for insurance against wide pH swings. The best means of increasing the calcium content is with calcium chloride. Calcium chloride can sometimes be found in deicing salts, but many are not pure calcium chloride so look to be sure. It can also be found in swim pool and spa supply locations as Hardness Increaser. It does generate a significant amount of heat as it contacts water so it is best added to a bucket of water and allowed to go into solution before adding to the pond.

      "Our goal is to assist with emergency and Koi health issues, as well as educate on best practices. Please help us gain a clear picture by giving the original poster time to answer our questions before offering opinions and suggested treatments."

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    5. #5
      ccokeman is offline Junior Member
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      This is where I am with it so far. Still have plenty of yard to clean up.

      Name:  Pond 8-20.jpg
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    6. #6
      ccokeman is offline Junior Member
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      I was reading some of his practices and it seems like I should adjust it. He was using both Epsom salt and Calcium Chloride to ensure he had enough magnesium as well if I understood his practice.
      Thanks for the feedback.

      Quote Originally Posted by jcardona1 View Post
      This is what Roddy says about GH. For this reason, I increase my GH using calcium chloride:
      Right now I have almost 0 algae in the pond so that may explain some of the consistency of the PH levels. What little there is resides in the waterfall. Thanks for the feedback. Time to hit the pool store this week.

      Quote Originally Posted by RichToyBox View Post
      If the GH is truly zero, then there will not be any calcium in the water. Calcium is needed to combine with the carbonates when the bicarb gives up a hydrogen ion to neutralize excess hydroxyl ions. Hydroxyls have a pH of 14. Carbonates have a pH of around 11 or 12, I think, but calcium carbonate is a solid precipitate that removes the carbonates from solution, neutralizing that from the mix and bringing the pH back to the pH of the bicarb, which about 8.3. If the pH is steady as you note, there is probably sufficient calcium for now, but I would try to maintain a value of about 50ppm just for insurance against wide pH swings. The best means of increasing the calcium content is with calcium chloride. Calcium chloride can sometimes be found in deicing salts, but many are not pure calcium chloride so look to be sure. It can also be found in swim pool and spa supply locations as Hardness Increaser. It does generate a significant amount of heat as it contacts water so it is best added to a bucket of water and allowed to go into solution before adding to the pond.

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