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    Thread: Pond redo bond beam

    1. #1
      FishAddict12 is offline Junior Member
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      Pond redo bond beam

      I’m redoing my pond and trying to make a form strong enough not to fill in the rest of the pond. I plan on putting compacted gravel and 2 sticks of rebar before I pour. The beam will be 18” wide x 6” deep. The shape is more rectangular than I originally planned, but I think it will be fine once the coping stones are placed? Does this cause any issues with the liner?
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      Nice job with the inside form. Be sure the rebar in continuous around the bond beam and are spread apart and at the half depth of your concrete. When you splice the rebar, overlap at least 6 inches and tie together securely with wire. Liner will have more wrinkles on the ends, but pond shape will be nice. 3.5" form for 6" bond beam?

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      Quote Originally Posted by Grumpy View Post
      Nice job with the inside form. Be sure the rebar in continuous around the bond beam and are spread apart and at the half depth of your concrete. When you splice the rebar, overlap at least 6 inches and tie together securely with wire. Liner will have more wrinkles on the ends, but pond shape will be nice. 3.5" form for 6" bond beam?
      The form is all 2” x 6” lumber and I used 6” lap siding for the bender board. Thanks for the tip on overlapping the rebar as I have a bunch of 10’ sticks so I will definitely need to overlap.

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      Well I managed to build a form and deck in one to pour my retro bond beam. I'll pour it tomorrow weather permitting. I discovered I'm terrible at bending 20' sticks of rebar by myself in a arc. How long should I let it cure before I remove the forms and dig the pond out, and tunnel under the bond beam and sidewalk for the bottom drain? I was thinking at least 2 days? Temperatures in WA are a low of 38 and high of 50 degrees.
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      Last edited by FishAddict12; 1 Week Ago at 11:56 PM.

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      Looks great!
      I wish I could remember how long I waited, but I can't. Have you seen this sticky?

      https://www.koiphen.com/forums/showt...on-on-concrete
      --Steve


      “First in excellence
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      The rebar and work deck looks great. A few planks across to the deck will be handy to carry those sacks of premix to the mixer that I hope you are renting. Start the stripping 48 hours after you finish the placement will be OK. Cover the fresh concrete with plastic or a tarp as soon as you can if it starts raining during you pour and keep it covered for those 48 hours. Fasten a bubble level to a 15 to 20" long 2x4 and use it as a striker to level off the pour will be handy. It will be a challenge to keep the mud out of the concrete without the outside form, but don't worry too much about it. I hope you have help coming for the pour

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      Quote Originally Posted by Grumpy View Post
      The rebar and work deck looks great. A few planks across to the deck will be handy to carry those sacks of premix to the mixer that I hope you are renting. Start the stripping 48 hours after you finish the placement will be OK. Cover the fresh concrete with plastic or a tarp as soon as you can if it starts raining during you pour and keep it covered for those 48 hours. Fasten a bubble level to a 15 to 20" long 2x4 and use it as a striker to level off the pour will be handy. It will be a challenge to keep the mud out of the concrete without the outside form, but don't worry too much about it. I hope you have help coming for the pour

      If it stops rainng today I'll go for it. I figured I might get a liitle dirt fall in off the outside edge, but I think it will still work. My ground is almost like concrete anyway.

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      Looks great. Pull that form and reuse it for a deck.

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      I had some guys working on some landscaping that gave me a hand mixing the concrete so it went really fast. I have never seen anyone mix it this way. They called it a Volcano. Giving it a couple days to setup then I'll get to dig it out and finally work on the bottom drain and TPR's. On the TPR's can I tie two pumps together to feed the TPR's if both pumps have check valves? I was thinking of using a Wye from a second pump on a occasional timer if my main pump doesn't have enough flow to make them work effectively.
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      Looks like it came out great.

      I'm not a big fan of trying to combine pump flow into one output... one pump for each
      circuit has worked better for myself.

      Great progress!
      --Steve


      “First in excellence
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      Quote Originally Posted by icu2 View Post
      Looks like it came out great.

      I'm not a big fan of trying to combine pump flow into one output... one pump for each
      circuit has worked better for myself.

      Great progress!
      Thanks! I think I’ll just run one TPR to my old pump and the other TPR off of my main waterfall pump.

      Any recommendations on optimal depth? I was planning on 48” straight down from the bond beam sloping to 54” to the bottom drain. Inside the bond beam is 12.5’ x 8’

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      Quote Originally Posted by FishAddict12 View Post
      Thanks! I think I’ll just run one TPR to my old pump and the other TPR off of my main waterfall pump.

      Any recommendations on optimal depth? I was planning on 48” straight down from the bond beam sloping to 54” to the bottom drain. Inside the bond beam is 12.5’ x 8’
      My tpr's are about 12" off the pond floor.
      --Steve


      “First in excellence
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      My tpr's are about 24" off the pond floor and provide rotation of the surface to the skimmer, but doesn't help clean the floor. 24" was too high.

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      Quote Originally Posted by Grumpy View Post
      My tpr's are about 24" off the pond floor and provide rotation of the surface to the skimmer, but doesn't help clean the floor. 24" was too high.
      I'm planning on the TPR's about 12"off the bottom. What I meant is there a optimum depth to the pond for koi? I have always heard at least 3.5-4' for predators, but I didn't know if there is a point where 6' or deeper is too much? Going down is really the only direction I can go to make the pond have more gallons so I'm trying to figure out if it's worth the added effort.

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      I can't find the forum discussion about depth that happened awhile back here, but, I remember folks documented their successful ponds that are very deep. The only drawback as I recall is netting fish when the depth is so great.

      I started with the intent of a liner pond 4 feet deep, but during excavation I ran into a seasonal spring that needed to be handled. By the time I got the spring controlled with piping I was over 6 feet. Alot of digging, but the soil was OK for it.

      In your case you are closer to the house than I, so I would consider that as you dig down. Monitor the soil conditions and remember the load into the ground from your house foundation is considered to spread out on a 45 degree angle from the house footing.

      If you start digging vertically on the inside edge of your bond beam, if the soil walls don't want to stand up on their own and start caving that will be your indication how deep you will be able to go. The maximum slope of the excavation can be determined by how long will the walls remain remain stable. Quite often when the soil is wet it will stand up well, but as the excavation continues, and the exposed soil dries out, the "natural angle of repose" of the soil will become apparent as the walls cave in.

      When hand digging inside the bond beam, the difficulty is removing the soil as you get deeper, how to transport it, and where to put it!

    16. #16
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      Quote Originally Posted by Grumpy View Post
      I can't find the forum discussion about depth that happened awhile back here, but, I remember folks documented their successful ponds that are very deep. The only drawback as I recall is netting fish when the depth is so great.

      I started with the intent of a liner pond 4 feet deep, but during excavation I ran into a seasonal spring that needed to be handled. By the time I got the spring controlled with piping I was over 6 feet. Alot of digging, but the soil was OK for it.

      In your case you are closer to the house than I, so I would consider that as you dig down. Monitor the soil conditions and remember the load into the ground from your house foundation is considered to spread out on a 45 degree angle from the house footing.

      If you start digging vertically on the inside edge of your bond beam, if the soil walls don't want to stand up on their own and start caving that will be your indication how deep you will be able to go. The maximum slope of the excavation can be determined by how long will the walls remain remain stable. Quite often when the soil is wet it will stand up well, but as the excavation continues, and the exposed soil dries out, the "natural angle of repose" of the soil will become apparent as the walls cave in.

      When hand digging inside the bond beam, the difficulty is removing the soil as you get deeper, how to transport it, and where to put it!
      Good point on the house and garage foundation. My ground is very rocky and solid, but I don't want to comprise the house. I'll dig down to 4' and see how things hold up before attempting to go deeper. When I dug the pond out the first time I had to use a jack hammer to get it to 42" deep as the John Deere 310 backhoe wouldn't dig it.

    17. #17
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      I got the deck/forms removed today during a rain storm and I'm ready for the fun part of digging it out the rest of the way the next few days. The real difficult part will be tunneling under the bond beam and side walk about 5' for the bottom drain. Any tips for tunneling is appreciated.
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    18. #18
      icu2's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by FishAddict12 View Post
      I got the deck/forms removed today during a rain storm and I'm ready for the fun part of digging it out the rest of the way the next few days. The real difficult part will be tunneling under the bond beam and side walk about 5' for the bottom drain. Any tips for tunneling is appreciated.
      Looks great!
      The one thing I found really helpful was use of a narrow "drain" type shovel. It was a slow
      brutal process but over the long run it was worth the effort.

      --Steve


      “First in excellence
      frist in pride"
      --Weeds

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      jiawei468 is offline Junior Member
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      Quote Originally Posted by icu2 View Post
      Looks great!
      The one thing I found really helpful was use of a narrow "drain" type shovel. It was a slow
      brutal process but over the long run it was worth the effort.

      can you explain a bit what is good about this kind of "drain" type shovel versus the wider kind of shovel? I guess easier to work with?

    20. #20
      icu2's Avatar
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      Yes, just less dirt to move and a narrower path to dig.
      --Steve


      “First in excellence
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