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  • Page 10 of 10 FirstFirst ... 78910
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    Thread: Low-Profile Shower Filter

    1. #181
      onebluemcm is offline Senior Member
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      Ok, so maybe it's a terminology issue. Perhaps the main point is that regardless of flow rate, a shower open to air is much less likely to have any real denitrification function, the cycle ending at nitrate. A shower that is sealed and can develop more of an anoxic environment could potentially be populated with bacteria that can denitrify NO3. It just so happens that the "trickle" part in this case is because there needs to be a lot of dwell time for these bugs to pull the oxygen off NO3, so these denitrifying setups have a trickle flow.

      This is just my understanding, it all started with this, and seems to be legit (the basic process anyway) from other reading I've done:

      http://www.mankysanke.co.uk/html/goo...de__pt_16.html

      (the mention of "blue" and "mauve" refer to a diagram in the link)

      "Trickle towers must only have a trickle of water through them. This is important because the incoming water will contain oxygen which will allow normal ammonia and nitrite bugs to live in the area in the media bed coloured blue and they will use all the available dissolved oxygen in the incoming water. Reducing the incoming flow to a trickle will confine their activity only to the top few centimetres of the bed. The real work of removing nitrate will be done by the facultative bugs in the area of the media coloured mauve. Since all the available oxygen will have been used by their cousins above, they will have to switch to facultative mode and obtain their oxygen supply from the nitrate in the water. Although we are cruelly starving them of oxygen in a trickle tower, they will repay our unkindness by removing nitrate for us!"

      Maybe this is more hypothetical than practical, interesting discussion regardless.

    2. #182
      icu2's Avatar
      icu2 is offline Administrator ~ WWKC Treasurer
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      Quote Originally Posted by onebluemcm View Post
      Ok, so maybe it's a terminology issue. Perhaps the main point is that regardless of flow rate, a shower open to air is much less likely to have any real denitrification function, the cycle ending at nitrate. A shower that is sealed and can develop more of an anoxic environment could potentially be populated with bacteria that can denitrify NO3. It just so happens that the "trickle" part in this case is because there needs to be a lot of dwell time for these bugs to pull the oxygen off NO3, so these denitrifying setups have a trickle flow.
      I'm not sure how much of a "seal" you mean but personally I've not seen any harm in locking the shower boxes together, putting
      a top on the shower, and enclosing it in a shed. The falling water seems to pull air into the filter by itself through whatever little
      spaces there are and it doesn't go anoxic.
      Just mho.
      --Steve
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    3. #183
      onebluemcm is offline Senior Member
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      Quote Originally Posted by icu2 View Post
      I'm not sure how much of a "seal" you mean but personally I've not seen any harm in locking the shower boxes together, putting
      a top on the shower, and enclosing it in a shed. The falling water seems to pull air into the filter by itself through whatever little
      spaces there are and it doesn't go anoxic.
      Just mho.
      Well I think the point is it would be a separate unit to try and remove nitrate, and this unit by itself needs to be sealed precisely because, to remove nitrate you have to starve the bacteria that can pull oxygen off NO3 of free oxygen. For a regular, primary shower filter, you would clearly not want that anoxic, as you said.

      Here we are getting this post off topic too. I guess enough is enough. It's not meant to be a primary filter, more like an ancillary unit that if the conditions are right, can remove some of the nitrate on it's own, independent of the other filters.

    4. #184
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      Any updates on how the filter is working for you? Have nitrates gone down any? Have you changed the flow rate any? Just curious...
      Click for Levittown, New York Forecast

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