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Koijazz
03-11-2009, 05:27 PM
I plan to breed my koi in April and am wondering what would be good food to feed them. Last year I did egg yolk, crushed koi food, crushed flake food, and little algae wafers. The egg yolk did nothing but pollute the water and I couldn't get the food crushed small enough even with a blender. The fry also never ate the algae wafers before it all was only a big fungus heap at the bottom. Oh and I've also tried hatching brine shrimp eggs but they never got them to hatch.:confused: So maybe some better instructions on hatching brine shrimp would help too. I've saved money for fry food but it's not a whole lot and the budget's tight. Any suggestions would be great. The fry are going to be living in an inflatable kiddie pool that's 3X4X1 feet. I also have one or two 20 gallon Rubbermaid tubs if they'll need more room. Thanks in advance!!!!!!

vipldy
03-11-2009, 06:12 PM
I plan to breed my koi in April and am wondering what would be good food to feed them. Last year I did egg yolk, crushed koi food, crushed flake food, and little algae wafers. The egg yolk did nothing but pollute the water and I couldn't get the food crushed small enough even with a blender. The fry also never ate the algae wafers before it all was only a big fungus heap at the bottom. Oh and I've also tried hatching brine shrimp eggs but they never got them to hatch.:confused: So maybe some better instructions on hatching brine shrimp would help too. I've saved money for fry food but it's not a whole lot and the budget's tight. Any suggestions would be great. The fry are going to be living in an inflatable kiddie pool that's 3X4X1 feet. I also have one or two 20 gallon Rubbermaid tubs if they'll need more room. Thanks in advance!!!!!!

Live food is the best for fry so I would read this link on a recipe for green water and live bugs that come from it..

http://www.koiphen.com/forums/showthread.php?t=61710

Live brine is the best but as they get a bit older frozen baby brine is good. We fed our's, live brine, frozen baby brine, frozen Delphinia, and Hikari First Bits which is a powdered food they loved..They went to tiny pellets from there...

Koijazz
03-11-2009, 06:24 PM
Would there be anything for fry to eat from the gunk from the bottom of the pond? We have lots of it! Could I raise the live bugs and such in the Rubbermaid tubs? I think our local petstore sells the powdered liquifry stuff. Is that any good?

vipldy
03-11-2009, 06:27 PM
Would there be anything for fry to eat from the gunk from the bottom of the pond? We have lots of it! Could I raise the live bugs and such in the Rubbermaid tubs? I think our local petstore sells the powdered liquifry stuff. Is that any good?
Liquifry was ok in the beggining..You might get the good bugs from the pond water but from what I have read you will need to feed the green water bugs so they live as well..Did you read all that in the link?

vipldy
03-11-2009, 06:32 PM
Here is a great link to buy supplies for the fry and free catalog..

http://www.aquaticeco.com/categories/Feed/141/0/

tyco4357
03-11-2009, 06:50 PM
You can hatch baby brine shrimp in just about anything as long as there is light. You can put eggs in a small glass container with a little bubbler. Make sure there is enough salt in the water. They will hatch in about 24-36 hours. When you want to harvest them, put a flashlight on the water and they will come to the surface. Take a fine net and scoop them out, put in with baby fry. When you are trying to hatch them put the bowl in a sunny window.

sundan
03-11-2009, 07:05 PM
Newly hatched brine shrimp, or nauplii, are an ideal first food for many fishes. They can be raised at home from dried eggs. It takes a couple of days for the eggs to hatch, so start the culture soon after the fish have spawned.

The fry of some species are very small and need a microscopic food, like infusoria to start them off in life.

Infusoria is a collective term for microscopic single-celled organisms, such as Euglena, Paramecium and various amoeba-like creatures. Infusoria cultures are easy to create, but take a few days to get going, so you'll need to start them off as soon as the fish have spawned.

Add a small piece of banana skin or lettuce leaf to a jar of pond water and place it on a sunny window sill for a few days. Once the water has become cloudy it should be heavily populated with infusoria. Add a little of the culture water to the tank several times each day.

Some fishkeepers provide infusoria substitutes made from powdered milk or infusions of mashed boiled egg. Alternatively, you can purchase specialist ultra-fine powdered infusoria substitutes.

Fry are weak swimmers and are easily drawn inside power filters. Use a gentle air-powered filter instead. Some believe fry may also feed on certain microorganisms living upon the sponge.

While unpleasant, the culling of fry is often a necessity. Concentrate your efforts on producing a small number of high quality fishes, rather than a mixture of good fish and poor quality, stunted specimens.

Deformed, or abberant specimens should be culled and should not be offered for sale or used as breeding stock.

Hybrid fry resulting from spawnings between different species should never be offered for sale.

Most breeders rear fry in scrupulously clean tanks with a bare bottom. Fish wastes and dead fry show up more clearly on a bare bottom and can be quickly and easily syphoned off using a length of airline tubing.

Pale polystyrene tiles showing through the base of the tank can look rather stark, so paint the underside of the tank black, or rest sheets of black cartridge paper on the polystyrene.

Infertile or damaged eggs may turn white and become attacked by aquatic fungi, like Saprolegnia. Poor hygiene or water quality can lead to more eggs becoming fungus, so keep the water in excellent condition.

Some breeders like to add chemicals such as acriflavine and methylene blue to the water to minimise fungal infections of the eggs. However, be careful. Methylene blue can have a serious effect on biological filtration and could lead to a deterioration in water quality.

Frequent water changes and excellent water conditions are extremely important on fry rearing tanks. Depending on the species, and the number of fish in the tank, it can pay to change 25% or more of the water every day or so. Use dechlorinated water of the same chemistry to that in the tank for water changes.

Frequent water changes accelerate growth, because they dilute the levels of pheromones in the water.
Infrequent water changes combined with overcrowding and poor diet can cause unhealthy and stunted growth.
Most broods of fry will include some fishes that grow considerably faster than others from the same brood. As they grow, larger fry may show aggression towards smaller fishes and get the lion's share of the food.

Koijazz
03-11-2009, 11:09 PM
Vipldy, do you know how long the can of Artificial Plankton Rotifer lasts? I've heard of some Koiphen members feeding the artificial rotifer before. For how long exactly do you feed the baby brine shrimp to the fry and how large of bulk would you buy of it? I'm trying to find the cheapest yet most successful way to feed fry and need LOTS of help!! Thank you tyco for the brine shrimp help. I hope I'll be more successful this time. Also thank you Sundan. Looking forward to more replies!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Koijazz
03-11-2009, 11:59 PM
Anyone know anything about microworms? Will the fry be able to eat them?

Koijazz
03-12-2009, 03:33 PM
What is the best recommended food for fry? Also, how do you know if there's actually any of the bugs in the water when you pour some in with the fry? Any advice would be wonderful!!!!!

Koijazz
03-12-2009, 04:54 PM
At the website vipldy sent me (http://www.aquaticeco.com/categories/Feed/141/0/) I found the following foods that might be good:
American BP Feed 500g $25.20
Artificial Plankton Rotifer 300g $14.40
Brine Shrimp Eggs 15oz $58.75
Rotemia Feed 500g $26.15
Rotofier 500g $29.90

I was wondering which would be the best to feed the fry and is at a good price. Thanks in advance!!!!!!:)

Rob Forbis
03-31-2009, 03:40 PM
Look at the water through your microscope to see the bugs!

AES has Artifical Rotifer AZ80085 in their catalog for fry, AZ80084 Artifical Artemia for a bit later. These cost about $5 for 1.5oz. I am feeding about 40 fry in an aquarium with a sponge filter, AES has these too. The fry are about 7dpf and they are eating the artifical rotifer with vigor. So depending on how many you want to raise this smaller amount of product might work.

Rob Forbis
04-14-2009, 10:43 AM
Today my fish are 21 dpf (18 dph). I have started feeding the Artificial Artemia in small and increasing amounts. There is such a disparity in fry size that both the artemia and rotifers are still required. All the baby fish seem to be doing well: fins in place and colors coming on. It is fascinating and informative raising a few in an aquarium (to start).

janine
04-22-2009, 11:04 AM
Hi I used microworms for my fry. They worked great. I did hatch some brine shrimp as well, but the easiest and most fun was the microworms. I started them on the worms at about two weeks. You culture them yourself with yeast, water and oatmeal...super easy, super cheap. You watch them (barely) wriggle around till the fry eat them. One swoosh of your finger along the inside of the jar produces a hundreds of live worms. I found it quite cool, but the kids nor DH would touch them! LOL. I googled and found info, then at the bottom of that site was a link to someone who sold them, they were cheap. If you have any problems getting some let me know, I'm done and I noticed my culture is still sitting there, I could start ya a batch and get them in the mail, before I toss them out.

Koijazz
04-22-2009, 12:19 PM
do you know which website you got them on? In the past I haven't had too much luck hatching brine shrimp eggs. Do they come with a mixture already made up in the appropriate container? I do have a yogurt container I can use to start a new culture.

janine
04-26-2009, 09:23 PM
http://www.microwormcultures.com/


That is where I got them. I used a disposable sandwich container, with a slit in the top, stuffed with cotton so gasses could escape but not worms. Then when I started a new batch I just threw the old one away and put the same lid on a new container. Easy to grow. The fishies loved them!

janine
04-26-2009, 09:27 PM
You will need plain Oatmeal, water and packet yeast each time you make a new batch, maybe about two week. It starts to get smelly. I got just the starter and made up my own in a shallow bowl, better then yogurt for swiping of the finger! Within a few days you'll have hundreds! A few more days...OMGosh thousands

Rob Forbis
05-01-2009, 09:11 AM
At 30 dpf I started feeding crushed goldfish flakes and koi food dust in addition to the artificial rotifers. There are still about 40 fry of very different sizes. This is about day 40. So far one fish has died, one was eaten by a toby that I then moved to the pond. All of the original spawn, I have added a very few from the three subsequent spawning, have their scales. One is clearly a doitsu. The colors at this point are mostly white, yellow and black only the slightest bit of red starting to show.