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Hirogoi
03-12-2008, 01:41 PM
I was wondering if it's acceptable to raise fry in a 6,600 gallon Sand n' Sun metal frame swimming pool? I've heard there may be some problems concerning the materials used in the siding. Is it possible to clean the siding or are there any kinds of pools that wont leak chemicals.

DesertPonder
03-12-2008, 02:37 PM
I wouldn't think there would be a problem but has it already been setup and run as a pool with chlorine?? Pool chemical residue could be a problem.
I know I've seen people use the plastic balloon type pools for fish and water plants. I use the large snap-set kiddie pools for my water lilies and a few fish during the summer.

Cowiche Ponder
03-12-2008, 02:38 PM
Many of us use the intex pools for quarantine or hospital tank. I prefer the frameset ones vs the quick set. They have been used by many.

Check with the manufacturer if they use algicides in their plastic

danzcool
03-12-2008, 03:26 PM
Many dealers use the various quickset above ground pools as QT systems for their recent imports. I'm not sure if they do something special to prep them.

Just Jessie
03-12-2008, 06:16 PM
I had my fish and plants in a 3500 gallon round inflatable edge pool while the new pond was under construction.
The only problem I had was water warmed very fast and I had a gill flukes (well, not me, the fish).

steveamy
03-12-2008, 09:55 PM
I have not found any problems with the intex pools. My fish are living in one right now. I have seen some different soft side pools that say the algecide is in the liner. I would be curious to know if it leaches into the water. I've never heard of anyone having a problem.

Ichthius
03-26-2008, 12:26 AM
Be very careful with new vinyl and epdm when raising fry.
The plasticizers can cause very uniformly deformed caudal peduncles.

In experiments other carp species were raised over large amounts of these plastics and their dorsal and anal fin fused completely removing the peduncle and caudal fins.

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JoesPonds.com
03-26-2008, 11:41 AM
I raised last year's fry in a 15' above-ground pool and didn't encounter any problems. They should be fine. So based on my experience, yes, I'd say go for it...

When it comes to water volume vs. price, you can't beat above-ground pools...

JoesPonds.com
03-26-2008, 11:41 AM
Oops. Double post.

Ichthius
03-26-2008, 01:37 PM
Was the pool brand new?

The plasticizers off gas fairly quickly but I'd wait atleast a season.

If you want to see what I'm talking about put a few eggs in a petri dish with some new vinyl airline tubing.

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Shorty
03-27-2008, 01:19 AM
I know a guy that was using the inflatable ring type pool, and a cat popped the side of it open. He thinks the cat could see the shadow of the fish, and batted at it with it's claw or jumped up on the side. He luckily noticed the water pouring out of the pool and rushed out to try and save the fish. He lost some, but most were saved.

Because of that, I have been leery about using the pools, there are a few neighborhood cats that make their way thru my yard.

Anyone else hear of anyone with a similar experience?

Lori Jo
03-27-2008, 01:36 AM
My neighbors son decided to teach the cat how to swim in their inflatable ring pool.. it popped and caused enough of a sag that the whole pool gushed out in a matter of seconds flooding the yard. It was quite a scene.. So yes, I would say that is a concern....

Cowiche Ponder
03-27-2008, 02:38 AM
I use the frameset for exactly that reason

DesertPonder
03-27-2008, 04:26 PM
I would think you would be better off using the large stock tanks. At least you know the cats can't pop them.:D:

Hirogoi
03-28-2008, 01:11 AM
I was actually planning on surrounding it with brick and putting a layer of sand in between the brick and the pool itself. I'd also be surrounding it by a good sized pond fence. If a raccoon even thinks of touching my fish, he's toast.

Toragoi
05-05-2008, 06:01 PM
I know a guy that was using the inflatable ring type pool, and a cat popped the side of it open. He thinks the cat could see the shadow of the fish, and batted at it with it's claw or jumped up on the side. He luckily noticed the water pouring out of the pool and rushed out to try and save the fish. He lost some, but most were saved.

Because of that, I have been leery about using the pools, there are a few neighborhood cats that make their way thru my yard.

Anyone else hear of anyone with a similar experience?

I have several Intex pools with the inflatable ring top. I also have a colony of over 30 cats, some of which like to jump up and hang out on top of said ring day after day after day. The rings don't puncture easily (though I do have a very slow leak in one of them), and I just can't see kitty claws puncturing the liner sidewalls--far too thick for that and if it could happen it would have already. I have found that even if the ring deflates to nada, the pool still holds water securely. It would take a vandal much larger than a house cat to cause a calamity like you described. Perhaps your friend's pool was not an Easy Set, but an entirely inflated kiddie pool made of cheap see-through plastic or the cat a mountain lion.....:rolleyes:

Toragoi
05-05-2008, 06:09 PM
I was actually planning on surrounding it with brick and putting a layer of sand in between the brick and the pool itself....

That's a great idea and I'm probably going to copy you before winter. One drawback to above ground pools--they get really cold really fast in the winter and warm/hot in the summer (depending on where you live). The brick and sand would help insulate as well as keep folk from leaning on the ring to see in.

Shorty
05-06-2008, 01:49 AM
I have several Intex pools with the inflatable ring top. I also have a colony of over 30 cats, some of which like to jump up and hang out on top of said ring day after day after day. The rings don't puncture easily (though I do have a very slow leak in one of them), and I just can't see kitty claws puncturing the liner sidewalls--far too thick for that and if it could happen it would have already. I have found that even if the ring deflates to nada, the pool still holds water securely. It would take a vandal much larger than a house cat to cause a calamity like you described. Perhaps your friend's pool was not an Easy Set, but an entirely inflated kiddie pool made of cheap see-through plastic or the cat a mountain lion.....:rolleyes:


His pool was a 10' intex easyset pool -- not only did he confirm that, but he also gave me the pump and filter, and the box the pool came in which was an intex easyset pool box.

And from Lori Jo's post, she saw it happen first hand.

Its great you are having success with your easyset pools, and for just a batch of fry, sure I'd feel OK about using a pool. But for my few keeper koi that I plan to keep forever, I just wouldn't feel safe keeping them in an intex pool (or other pool like them). There are plenty of hard sided tanks available. You can even buy fiberglass tanks which have bolt together panels, so they are cheap to ship.
http://www.aquaculturetanks.com/

Would be cheaper to build a plywood tank like the many types featured in other threads. Or dry stack cinder blocks, and make a rebar bond beam ring - then put a liner down inside it.

garyr
05-06-2008, 03:51 PM
I've had mine in the inflatable ring 2800 gal pool for a year and a half now. That wasn't the plan, but sometimes construction takes much longer than it ought to.

The inflatable part has deflated several times. cold weather, bird claws, etc. The pool supports itself fine, if it slumped and dumped it would have had to be on a non level surface. They are sensitive to that. The ring just stabilizes the edge. With kids using it as a swimming pool it would collapse over the soft edge, but koi don't splash the way kids do. The actual pool material is very tough. Dog proof, cat proof, heron proof. A wolverine or a bear? Probably not.

When I got it, it stank of VOCs. I spread it out in the sun for a few days to outgas and it seemed fine. The fish certainly have no problem with it and have spawned at least twice since they went in.

The weakest point is the existing filter inlet/outlet fittings. If I were planning on using it much longer (I'm finally ready to bring in an excavator) I'd fit in a 3" bulkhead fitting where there is now a drain valve and use that to feed the leaf trap and pump.