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  • Results 1 to 13 of 13

    Thread: Putting pipes in trenches

    1. #1
      pickerel's Avatar
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      Putting pipes in trenches

      I don't know much about putting pipes in the ground. I have searched the forum but want to run this by you guys. I will have two incoming 3" pipes and four outgoing 2" pipes. I plan to rent a walk behind 18" (4" wide) trencher. This diagram shows how the pipes can fit, and it looks like I will need separate trenches for the two sizes. Is this arrangement ok? A local friend said just pile them on top of each other, but on here I have read to have them separated by soil. I don't expect that there will ever be any big equipment driving over them.

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      mplskoi is offline Supporting Member
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      I know you don't deal with the cold like we do up north. But I would put 2 inch thick insulation above the pipes. If the ground freezes to the level of the top of your pipe that will really cool you whole pond. You will never regret any effort you put into insulation. You will only ever regret not insulating while you had the chance.

    3. #3
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      Do not pile pipes on top of each other. Ideally they are backfilled and packed with sand around them. If no sand hand tamp and pack with the finest soil you have on site (preferably clay). Pack one pipe in and then lay the next on. Fresh dug ground always settles and packing them in lessens the chance of something bad happening. It's worth the extra effort.

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      If you attempt two trenches close together as you sketched, it can easily become one wide single trench and you will have plenty of room to lay the pipe and compact soil around each one individually. Depending upon your existing soil moisture and type, you usually improve the compaction by adding some water as you backfill.

    5. #5
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      Every time I have to repair pipes laid in the same trench .
      I wish they were separated by at least a inch .



    6. #6
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      Quote Originally Posted by mplskoi View Post
      I know you don't deal with the cold like we do up north. But I would put 2 inch thick insulation above the pipes. If the ground freezes to the level of the top of your pipe that will really cool you whole pond. You will never regret any effort you put into insulation. You will only ever regret not insulating while you had the chance.
      I wouldn't have thought of that; good idea.

      Quote Originally Posted by BWG View Post
      Do not pile pipes on top of each other. Ideally they are backfilled and packed with sand around them. If no sand hand tamp and pack with the finest soil you have on site (preferably clay). Pack one pipe in and then lay the next on. Fresh dug ground always settles and packing them in lessens the chance of something bad happening. It's worth the extra effort.
      Thanks for the feedback; I will do that.

      Quote Originally Posted by Grumpy View Post
      If you attempt two trenches close together as you sketched, it can easily become one wide single trench and you will have plenty of room to lay the pipe and compact soil around each one individually. Depending upon your existing soil moisture and type, you usually improve the compaction by adding some water as you backfill.
      Good idea. Near the pump is the only place that will be necessary. A few feet out, they start branching off. Thanks!

      Quote Originally Posted by delbert View Post
      Every time I have to repair pipes laid in the same trench .
      I wish they were separated by at least a inch .
      That sounds like a nightmare, but I'm not planning to have any leaks. Great information. Thanks!

    7. #7
      coolwon is offline Senior Member
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      Would it be feasible/beneficial to use granulated polystyrene in the installation?

      Garfield
      Find more about Weather in Durban, ZA

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      I don't know; that's an idea. I don't know how well it would compress for packing down around the pipes. It seems to me it might be better to pack the dirt in tight and then lay the 2-inch foam board over top as was stated before.

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      I stacked pipes fairly tight in a trench and have had no problems. Three 4" lines, two 1" for air, seven 2" TPR lines. I filled with DG and tamped lightly before backfilling. I didn't have to worry about freezes and only foot traffic above them. I used the best sched 40 pipe I could find and pressure tested each before covering. It would be a nightmare if I ever have a leak.

      http://www.koiphen.com/forums/showth...72#post1000672

    10. #10
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      Thanks for the reminder avorancher...I temporarily forgot about my two air lines, electrical, and fresh water lines. I think I will be making a wider trench as Grumpy stated above. BTW, I like how you did your TPRs. Beautiful pond.
      Last edited by pickerel; 2 Weeks Ago at 12:42 PM.

    11. #11
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      I wouldn't use granulated styrofoam or poly. Surely it would work well but when it came time to dig it up you couldn't recapture it. The pink or blue foam tends to be better and longer lasting in damp conditions. But honestly I think anything that you do helps. I have bought (or gotten for free off of Craigslist) that blue solar cover floated in swimming pools. You can fold it several layers thick and lay it in a trench on top of the top pipe. And even wrap it down onto the sides of the pipe. My neighbors 600 gallon goldie pond had to keep the pipes only about 8 inches below ground level. Even when our temps hit minus 10 up here their pipes don't freeze and their pond never goes below 50 degrees all winter. No heater. Just well insulated. Pink board 2 inches thick around the entire pond to 3 feet down and pipes and filtration wrapped in blue solar cover.

    12. #12
      coolwon is offline Senior Member
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      Quote Originally Posted by mplskoi View Post
      I wouldn't use granulated styrofoam or poly. Surely it would work well but when it came time to dig it up you couldn't recapture it. The pink or blue foam tends to be better and longer lasting in damp conditions. But honestly I think anything that you do helps. I have bought (or gotten for free off of Craigslist) that blue solar cover floated in swimming pools. You can fold it several layers thick and lay it in a trench on top of the top pipe. And even wrap it down onto the sides of the pipe. My neighbors 600 gallon goldie pond had to keep the pipes only about 8 inches below ground level. Even when our temps hit minus 10 up here their pipes don't freeze and their pond never goes below 50 degrees all winter. No heater. Just well insulated. Pink board 2 inches thick around the entire pond to 3 feet down and pipes and filtration wrapped in blue solar cover.


      I think you would lose a lot less heat per pipe into the surrounding soil.

      Would you need to recapture the styrene if the pipework and labor fitment were up to scratch?

      Garfield
      Find more about Weather in Durban, ZA

    13. #13
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      Quote Originally Posted by coolwon View Post
      I think you would lose a lot less heat per pipe into the surrounding soil.

      Would you need to recapture the styrene if the pipework and labor fitment were up to scratch?

      Garfield
      I was just thinking that someday when you dig up your pond that it would not be a good thing to leave loose styrene in the soil as a pollutant. Probably not a big deal, there are lots of other plastic and petrochemical things that are worse for the environment that are left buried in our yards. But.....

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