• Amused
  • Angry
  • Annoyed
  • Awesome
  • Bemused
  • Cocky
  • Cool
  • Crazy
  • Crying
  • Depressed
  • Down
  • Drunk
  • Embarrased
  • Enraged
  • Friendly
  • Geeky
  • Godly
  • Happy
  • Hateful
  • Hungry
  • Innocent
  • Meh
  • Piratey
  • Poorly
  • Sad
  • Secret
  • Shy
  • Sneaky
  • Tired
  • Results 1 to 6 of 6

    Thread: Blue Eco Conversion to motor drive step-by-step

    1. #1
      icu2's Avatar
      icu2 is offline Administrator ~ WWKC Treasurer
      is usually here but if not I'm
      probably off flying
       
      Feeling:
      Piratey
       
      Join Date
      Feb 2007
      Location
      Poulsbo, WA
      Posts
      26,151

      Blue Eco Conversion to motor drive step-by-step

      This is a condensed thread on the specific steps I used when motorizing my Blue Eco RDF
      with the kit provided by Tung Tran (tung.tran@yahoo.com) for anyone doing the conversion.

      Here are some things I used for the conversion in addition to the kit...

      A timer. I use the Sentinel DRT-1. This is a really good timer but no longer made so you can normally
      only find them on eBay now. Many people use a high/low sensor to start and stop the cleaning cycle
      instead of a timer but I didn't use one so I won't be of much help if you go that route.

      An electric solenoid valve. This will take the place of the float that operates the cleaning cycle in
      the rdf now. They make ones that work on 24v and 12v too but you'll need a converter. The
      one I bought is a straight 110v version.

      https://www.ebay.com/i/301768546130?chn=ps

      The motor and geathead. This is model is the only one that will work with the white plastic
      disc and metal shaft in the kit. The motor is not water proof so it has to be protected
      from the weather if your RDF is exposed outside. Oriental Motors does make other
      weather proof motors but this isn't one of them and if you want to get a waterproof
      one I would call and talk to Oriental Motors directly so you get the correct model.
      They don't take returns so you have to be sure to order the right one!

      https://catalog.orientalmotor.com/it...-aw2u-5ge180rh

      Part number 5IK90GE-AW2U General Motor $148.00
      Part number 5GE180RH Right Angle Gear (AC) $225.00

      Subtotal: $373.00
      Shipping: $0.00
      Tax: $33.58
      Total: $406.58

      The motor and gear come with a separate startup capacitor that you have to wire. It
      also comes with no power cord so you'll need to wire one for this as well as the
      electric solenoid. They're under $10 at the hardware store.

      So, if you're ready to have your RDF off line for a while (I think it took me a week or two to get it
      all back to working), the first thing I did is turn off the UV inside it, shut off the valves to the
      inputs, and drain as much water as I could out of the rdf. Then I took out the bracket and float
      that operates the cleaning process of the drum that are in the lower left of this picture. Also remove
      the horizontal plunger that operates the gear that turns the drum. It should just be held on with a bolt
      and nut in the front of it:



      Then open the hunter valve which is this black valve that was under the plunger. Remove the 4 screws
      and pry off the top of the valve. Then remove the diaphragm from the valve and then just replace
      the cap and screws. What this does is let water just flow through that valve like it's not there.



      The one thing I found on mine is there is a small hole that is some sort of pressure release and leaks water out
      when the spray bar operates if the diaphragm is removed, so I just put a small screw to plug most of the flow. It
      doesn't really hurt anything as it's just flowing into the clean side of the rdf, but it does reduces the pressure at the
      spray bar a little so plugging it will add a little pressure.



      You can remove the whole valve if you want but the pipe is 32mm and you'd need an adapter to
      replace the section where the valve was. It wasn't worth it to me so I just left it and it still works fine.

      Next you need to cut and plug all the pressure lines. If I remember right I think there were 3. I just cut
      the plastic pipe and then heated and pinched the hose close so there were no leaks. *One line extends
      all the way into the drum to the hunter valve that operates the waste valve which can just be removed.
      *NOTE: My hunter valve that operated the waste valve was broken so mine was disabled. If yours still works
      you may want to try and leave the pressure line to it intact. I don't know for a fact that it will still operate
      and you may need to disable your waste valve if it doesn't. This could be a bigger issue if your water level is
      normally above the waste tray.



      My example pictures may be a little different since I'm using a pressure pump instead of my house water
      line to feed the rdf spray bar, but it should operate the same even if you're using the your houses service line.
      You'll need to cut the house water pressure line feeding the rdf and install the new electric solenoid valve
      in line with it. If your solenoid is like mine you'll need to wire a plug onto the valve. I just soldered the wires and
      used heat shrink tubing to seal the open wires.



      This plug wire will need to be long enough to route to your timer if using one.

      Once the electric solenoid is wired you can test it if using a timer. I mounted my timer in a dry location
      and put a power strip next to it since I had 3 devices to plug into it, the solenoid, the motor, and the pump.
      If using your homes service line you should only have two... the solenoid and the motor and the timer I linked
      to at the beginning already has two plugs.
      Notice the outlet plug at the top of the power strip; that's a plug with a on/off switch on
      it. This is handy because once the new motor is installed, you can't move the drum like
      you used to in order to open the screen hatch to access the waste tray. So I plug the motor
      into it when I need to manually turn the drum and not turn on the solenoid and pump and can
      stop it when the access hatch in the drum is at the right location.



      So now you should be able to start the water for the cleaning cycle with your new solenoid and
      timer. Of course the drum won't turn since it's not motorized... which is our next step!
      To start I replaced the sprocket on the shaft that is mounted to the drum. I found the simplest
      way was to remove the 3 nuts and bolts that attach the shaft to the drum. Then just took the
      old one off and put the new one on and reattached the shaft to the drum and made sure everything
      still lined up turned normally.



      I wanted the gear that would be mounted to the motor and would turn the drum to be positioned
      right above the large sprocket. So I took the blue gear from the kit and put it against the inside of
      the rdf outside wall and positioned it so it was meshed with the large sprocket and then drew a circle
      around the gear shaft. Since I didn't have room to get my drill on the inside of the rdf, I measured as
      best I could from the top and side where I should drill a pilot hole. In this picture you can see where
      I drew around the base of the gear and drilled the pilot hole... but then realized I was off from being
      right above the large sprocket where I wanted to be! So I redrew it, drilled another pilot hole, and
      then used the hole saw that came with the kit to cut the final hole. The good part is that the disc that
      comes with the kit is large enough that it easily sealed the hole that was off center. After I drilled the
      hole for the motor shaft I marked the smaller mounting holes for the disc itself and drilled holes for it
      too.



      So after the silicone is dry you can remove the 4 smaller bolts and mount the motor. You
      can see the raised circle on the disc which should line up with the gearhead. Mount the motor
      on the gearhead and mount the gearhead with the shaft and small gear on the rdf.



      The motor should have come with a startup capacitor that needs to be wired along with
      a power cord that will run to the timer. I soldered the wires onto the capacitor and used
      shrink tube on it to insulate them. I just used contact cement to attach the capacitor to the
      rdf but it can be mounted anywhere.





      At this point you should just have to dial in the "off time" and the "on time" duration for the
      timer. Right now mine is set so it's off for about 30 minutes and on for the cleaning cycle for
      about 15 seconds, but start with a shorter time than you probably need and increase it until
      you get to a point where the water level outside the drum drops about the right amount. I noticed
      on mine that it only takes a small amount of disturbing the pond to effect the rate at which the
      rdf needs to cycle, so be aware of that if anything is changed and shorten the cycle time as needed
      until things are "normal" again.

      That's about it! Using a timer takes some experimenting to get the times right, but I've found the
      motor used in this conversion is so powerful that it has no problem turning the drum even if the
      clean side of the rdf is empty. This puts a lot of strain on it so avoid running it empty as much as
      possible... but knowing it has the ability to turn it if needed, is comforting.

      Hope that helps and if you motorized your BE rdf and found a method or procedure that would
      make it easier for the next person, feel free to share!
      --Steve
      Find more about Weather in Poulsbo, WA

      "It is far better to be alone, than to be in bad company." --George Washington

    2. #2
      avorancher is offline Senior Member
      This user has no status.
       
      Feeling:
      ----
       
      Join Date
      Dec 2006
      Location
      Deluz, CA
      Posts
      2,480
      Steve, I couldn't purchase the entire kit and only have the pinion and spur gears. I purchased an oriental motor that is different (a lot cheaper model) but it has a 5/8" keyed drive shaft that is only an inch long... too short to work without modification. Did your motor have a keyed shaft and if so, how did the kit handle the seal? I was planning on getting a longer sleeve to go over the keyed shaft for the seal to ride on but most 5/8" shaft sleeves are at least 3/4" thick and the pinion gear only has a 14mm hole, leaving too little plastic left if I drilled it out to 3/4". I may have to visit a machine shop to get an adapter shaft made.

      BTW: I plugged the holes in the 32mm pressurized PVC where the blue tubing was with standard 1/4" nylon plugs from a hardware store, and the 32mm male PVC fittings seem to fit standard 1" female threads which I will use to replace the old valve unit. Of course, I haven't tested anything yet so all my stuff is theory at this point.

    3. #3
      icu2's Avatar
      icu2 is offline Administrator ~ WWKC Treasurer
      is usually here but if not I'm
      probably off flying
       
      Feeling:
      Piratey
       
      Join Date
      Feb 2007
      Location
      Poulsbo, WA
      Posts
      26,151
      Quote Originally Posted by avorancher View Post
      Steve, I couldn't purchase the entire kit and only have the pinion and spur gears. I purchased an oriental motor that is different (a lot cheaper model) but it has a 5/8" keyed drive shaft that is only an inch long... too short to work without modification. Did your motor have a keyed shaft and if so, how did the kit handle the seal? I was planning on getting a longer sleeve to go over the keyed shaft for the seal to ride on but most 5/8" shaft sleeves are at least 3/4" thick and the pinion gear only has a 14mm hole, leaving too little plastic left if I drilled it out to 3/4". I may have to visit a machine shop to get an adapter shaft made.

      BTW: I plugged the holes in the 32mm pressurized PVC where the blue tubing was with standard 1/4" nylon plugs from a hardware store, and the 32mm male PVC fittings seem to fit standard 1" female threads which I will use to replace the old valve unit. Of course, I haven't tested anything yet so all my stuff is theory at this point.
      Just to be clear, the one I bought has a motor and a separate gearhead. The gearhead has a keyed hollow
      shaft and the kit supplied a keyed shaft that fits the through the sleeve in the gearhead and a threaded nut
      that goes on the shaft to hold it in place.
      Here's some pictures of it that might help:

      Gearhead and motor:

      Name:  gearhead.jpg
Views: 80
Size:  10.1 KB

      https://www.orientalmotor.com/produc...ac_ra_gear.pdf

      Kit shaft:

      Name:  20180621_110109.jpg
Views: 80
Size:  58.0 KB

      Name:  20180621_110118.jpg
Views: 78
Size:  58.8 KB

      Name:  20180621_110139.jpg
Views: 79
Size:  62.6 KB

      Name:  20180621_110146.jpg
Views: 79
Size:  65.7 KB

      The seal is set in a plastic (not sure what the material is) disc. Some pics:

      Name:  20180621_110316.jpg
Views: 77
Size:  29.8 KB

      Name:  20180621_110704.jpg
Views: 76
Size:  39.6 KB

      The motor side of the disc:

      Name:  motor mount.jpg
Views: 77
Size:  49.4 KB

      The gearhead alone mounted on the disc:

      Name:  motor mount with gear head.jpg
Views: 77
Size:  66.5 KB

      Hopefully that helped show it but if not let me know and I'll try and get you the right
      measurements.

      And good call on the plastic plugs. Let us know how they work out.
      I ordered some 32mm to 1" slip x slip adapters but they were ridiculously expensive... and
      then I never used them and just left the disabled valve in there.
      --Steve
      Find more about Weather in Poulsbo, WA

      "It is far better to be alone, than to be in bad company." --George Washington

    4. #4
      avorancher is offline Senior Member
      This user has no status.
       
      Feeling:
      ----
       
      Join Date
      Dec 2006
      Location
      Deluz, CA
      Posts
      2,480
      I purchased this motor/gearhead combination.
      Motor: https://catalog.orientalmotor.com/it...ads/4ik25gv-ua
      Gearhead: https://catalog.orientalmotor.com/it...eads-2/4gv180a

      The total price ($137) was much less than the one you are using and combined, it is 1/30hp and has 141 lb/in torque which (I think) should be enough to drive the drum under any circumstance. Since the gearbox is not right-angled it will put the weight of the motor further from the BE frame but I think the stainless is quite sturdy and should not give me any flex. If it does, I can reinforce it from the outside.

      Once I start putting everything together this winter, I'll do a writeup on mine since I could not get the entire kit from Tung. My gearbox has a male shaft while your gearbox was female and the kit's shaft threaded into it. The threaded hole in my gearbox shaft is a metric #10 which isn't large enough to support the torque that the pinion will probably need, so I'll probably have to have a shaft made that goes on the outside of the gearbox shaft for the seal to ride on, then stepped down to the size of the pinion.

      How is your pinion anchored to the kit's shaft? My pinion isn't keyed nor does it have a set screw to keep it from rotating on a shaft.

      My current plan unless I can come up with a better idea:
      Name:  BE-adapter.jpg
Views: 70
Size:  23.0 KB

    5. #5
      icu2's Avatar
      icu2 is offline Administrator ~ WWKC Treasurer
      is usually here but if not I'm
      probably off flying
       
      Feeling:
      Piratey
       
      Join Date
      Feb 2007
      Location
      Poulsbo, WA
      Posts
      26,151
      Thanks for the drawing... that helps a lot. And I see what you mean now; I think your plan should work
      if you can find a sleeve to extend the shaft and you can see the shaft I got with the kit is stepped down
      for the pinion gear with the larger middle section for the seal too. I don't think you'll have a problem
      with the straight gearhead either. Not much flex in with the SS wall! I contemplated using one like that but
      it was only a few dollars more for the 90* one so I went with that.

      The kit just comes with a nut to secure the pinion gear to the shaft. I added a SS split lock washer. I'm
      not sure what they're called but I saw another kit user use one of those cupped shaped washer so it tightens
      against the gear. Because it's plastic, the split washer I have on it seems to dig in a little and helps hold it
      securely. Just to test it I let the clean side empty so the drum would be VERY difficult to turn and the gear
      never had a problem with slipping.

      Name:  gears mesh.jpg
Views: 67
Size:  61.1 KB

      Did you get the plastic disc and seal or are you just planning on doing something similar?
      I'm looking forward to seeing your conversion!
      --Steve
      Find more about Weather in Poulsbo, WA

      "It is far better to be alone, than to be in bad company." --George Washington

    6. #6
      avorancher is offline Senior Member
      This user has no status.
       
      Feeling:
      ----
       
      Join Date
      Dec 2006
      Location
      Deluz, CA
      Posts
      2,480
      No, didn't get anything from the kit except the pinion and spur gears. After seeing your photos, I decided to use a thick polyethylene cutting board to make the plastic spacer. I can make it a little larger to help distribute the extra weight of the motor, and cut the holes needed to hold the seal. The plastic spacer is a good idea because it gives you the thickness to hold the seal. Have to wait to get my shaft adapter before I can get the seal because I don't know the diameter of the adapter yet.

      I was planning to drill a small hole through the pinion shoulder and shaft and putting a cotter pin through it to hold it in place but if that nut and washer is holding for you, I may just go that route.

      My biggest holdup at this point is having to shut down my two nexus 300 filters and build a 600 gallon moving bed filter for all the mature K1. I installed the Nexus filters before building the filter house around them... so I have to take out a window and cut an opening in the stucco wall to get enough space to get them out. I never thought I would be removing them and not enough room to keep them and the BE.

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •