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  • Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234
    Results 61 to 77 of 77

    Thread: Please help me understand.

    1. #61
      RichToyBox's Avatar
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      Since you are basing your estimate of the pond size on dimensions, which are OK if the pond walls are vertical, and the corners are square, or the pond is a perfect circle, but are much less reliable if the pond has sloped walls, as the dimensions of the bottom are much less, ponds with shelves for plants, ponds with irregular shapes as curves cut off part of the top area of the rectangle. You can get a TDS meter from Amazon or other sites and take a measurement of the total dissolved solids, then add a measured amount of salt (use something close to 17 to 20 pounds, bag of salt for water softener, solar crystals, in water softener section of hardware is 40 pounds), and after a couple of days remeasure the TDS. The difference can then be used with the calculator located at the top of the page to determine volume. This method is much more accurate than dimensions. As accurate a measure as possible is important when it comes time to treat for parasites or other uses of chemicals as an under dose is ineffective and an overdose can kill the fish.

      "Our goal is to assist with emergency and Koi health issues, as well as educate on best practices. Please help us gain a clear picture by giving the original poster time to answer our questions before offering opinions and suggested treatments."

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    2. #62
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      Quote Originally Posted by RichToyBox View Post
      Since you are basing your estimate of the pond size on dimensions, which are OK if the pond walls are vertical, and the corners are square, or the pond is a perfect circle, but are much less reliable if the pond has sloped walls, as the dimensions of the bottom are much less, ponds with shelves for plants, ponds with irregular shapes as curves cut off part of the top area of the rectangle. You can get a TDS meter from Amazon or other sites and take a measurement of the total dissolved solids, then add a measured amount of salt (use something close to 17 to 20 pounds, bag of salt for water softener, solar crystals, in water softener section of hardware is 40 pounds), and after a couple of days remeasure the TDS. The difference can then be used with the calculator located at the top of the page to determine volume. This method is much more accurate than dimensions. As accurate a measure as possible is important when it comes time to treat for parasites or other uses of chemicals as an under dose is ineffective and an overdose can kill the fish.
      Thanks I’ll look into that. Do you think my assumption made a few posts up about the bubbles and the way they look now vs what they looked like a few weeks before the death of the fish as well as the day of the death makes sense?


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    3. #63
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      Yes. Cleaner water does not support the bubbles like that with the proteins (DOC's). Over feeding, under filtering, under water changing, will lead to the increased proteins, which your water changes and filter cleanings have removed significant amounts of the foam. If it builds, it is a definite sign that additional water changes are needed.

      "Our goal is to assist with emergency and Koi health issues, as well as educate on best practices. Please help us gain a clear picture by giving the original poster time to answer our questions before offering opinions and suggested treatments."

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    4. #64
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      Quote Originally Posted by RichToyBox View Post
      Yes. Cleaner water does not support the bubbles like that with the proteins (DOC's). Over feeding, under filtering, under water changing, will lead to the increased proteins, which your water changes and filter cleanings have removed significant amounts of the foam. If it builds, it is a definite sign that additional water changes are needed.
      Thanks. Do you think that combined with a storm that potentially agitated the water would’ve been enough to drop the oxygen levels to a spot where all life in the pond could die in a single blow? If so would there be a way to explain the 0 nitrate and 0 nitrite levels the following day? Could the water read 0s because the foam contained the nitrates?


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    5. #65
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      I found that salt method pretty reliable the one time I had to salt my pond. Since the pond is empty (fishless) you can also drain it and refill but this time turn off all water supply in the house while taking note of your water utility meter as you refill the pond. Protect your filter from chloramine/chlorine if you plan on saving it.

      This is a picture of my pond (not recent) to demonstrate how the liner is bunched up around the perimeter preventing run-offs. I found in my small pond that even a simple thunderstorm can kick in enough nutrients to start an algae bloom a couple of days later. Since I make sure that areas between the boulders around the pond perimeter is clean. You are doing well if the pond stays clear, you see bottom well, your parameters are stable, no collection of foam; even after a thunderstorm or rain event. This means your filters are big enough and you're doing enough water changes.

      (two laguna filters shown here and two others located remotely)

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    6. #66
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      Quote Originally Posted by szweier View Post
      Thanks. Do you think that combined with a storm that potentially agitated the water would’ve been enough to drop the oxygen levels to a spot where all life in the pond could die in a single blow? If so would there be a way to explain the 0 nitrate and 0 nitrite levels the following day? Could the water read 0s because the foam contained the nitrates?


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      I don't know. The nitrates could have been diluted significantly if the rain were heavy enough, but it would take a very large water change to bring the values to zero.

      "Our goal is to assist with emergency and Koi health issues, as well as educate on best practices. Please help us gain a clear picture by giving the original poster time to answer our questions before offering opinions and suggested treatments."

      Zone 7 A/B
      Keep your words sweet. You never know when you may have to eat them.
      Richard

    7. #67
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      Quote Originally Posted by KoiRun View Post
      I found that salt method pretty reliable the one time I had to salt my pond. Since the pond is empty (fishless) you can also drain it and refill but this time turn off all water supply in the house while taking note of your water utility meter as you refill the pond. Protect your filter from chloramine/chlorine if you plan on saving it.

      This is a picture of my pond (not recent) to demonstrate how the liner is bunched up around the perimeter preventing run-offs. I found in my small pond that even a simple thunderstorm can kick in enough nutrients to start an algae bloom a couple of days later. Since I make sure that areas between the boulders around the pond perimeter is clean. You are doing well if the pond stays clear, you see bottom well, your parameters are stable, no collection of foam; even after a thunderstorm or rain event. This means your filters are big enough and you're doing enough water changes.

      (two laguna filters shown here and two others located remotely)

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      Nice. Quick question. What do you mean by “Protect your filter from chloramine/chlorine if you plan on saving it. “


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    8. #68
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      Quote Originally Posted by RichToyBox View Post
      I don't know. The nitrates could have been diluted significantly if the rain were heavy enough, but it would take a very large water change to bring the values to zero.
      Right. I don’t think it was that much rain to be able to do that but I can’t help but think the amount of bubbles I had in the pond before and then the increase after was an indicator of what the problem was. But I could be wrong.


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    9. #69
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      Fresh tap water is treated with chlorine or chloramine for bacterial control, which will kill the bacteria in the filters. Use a good chemical appropriate for the type of treatment, like Safe or Prime for chloramine or any dechlorinator for chlorine treatment.

      "Our goal is to assist with emergency and Koi health issues, as well as educate on best practices. Please help us gain a clear picture by giving the original poster time to answer our questions before offering opinions and suggested treatments."

      Zone 7 A/B
      Keep your words sweet. You never know when you may have to eat them.
      Richard

    10. #70
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      Quote Originally Posted by RichToyBox View Post
      Fresh tap water is treated with chlorine or chloramine for bacterial control, which will kill the bacteria in the filters. Use a good chemical appropriate for the type of treatment, like Safe or Prime for chloramine or any dechlorinator for chlorine treatment.
      Is that only if I were planning to do a replacement of all water in my pond or is this something I need to consider when doing any and all water changes.


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    11. #71
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      Quote Originally Posted by szweier View Post
      Nice. Quick question. What do you mean by “Protect your filter from chloramine/chlorine if you plan on saving it. “


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      I'm assuming you are still running this filter even though your pond is empty. I'm assuming you still have some live bacteria in that filter that could lie dormant at present and will be useful when you re-stock your pond (I don't know your time frame). If you refill your pond with tap water containing chloramine / chlorine you are basically disinfecting your filter (killing the beneficial bacteria). I don't know if this is a well-grounded logic though. But I would throw in some declor just in case.
      Time you enjoy wasting is not wasted time. ---- Marthe Troly-Curtin



    12. #72
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      Quote Originally Posted by KoiRun View Post
      I'm assuming you are still running this filter even though your pond is empty. I'm assuming you still have some live bacteria in that filter that could lie dormant at present and will be useful when you re-stock your pond (I don't know your time frame). If you refill your pond with tap water containing chloramine / chlorine you are basically disinfecting your filter (killing the beneficial bacteria). I don't know if this is a well-grounded logic though. But I would throw in some declor just in case.
      I’m not sure of my time frame either. That being said I asked above but thought I’d ask it in this reply as well. Is the declor necessary only if I were to change out all of the water or is it also needed for water changes in general?


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    13. #73
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      Quote Originally Posted by szweier View Post
      I’m not sure of my time frame either. That being said I asked above but thought I’d ask it in this reply as well. Is the declor necessary only if I were to change out all of the water or is it also needed for water changes in general?


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      With a whole pond change-out I would say yes for sure you need to dechlorinate. But for partial water changes I would say debatable and it has been at times in forums. The old saying goes (if you haven't heard) 'every pond is different' or 'to each her own.' I use Seachem Safe for my water changes.
      Time you enjoy wasting is not wasted time. ---- Marthe Troly-Curtin



    14. #74
      szweier is offline Member
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      Quote Originally Posted by KoiRun View Post
      With a whole pond change-out I would say yes for sure you need to dechlorinate. But for partial water changes I would say debatable and it has been at times in forums. The old saying goes (if you haven't heard) 'every pond is different' or 'to each her own.' I use Seachem Safe for my water changes.
      Yea I figured the “every pond is different” type of comment would surface eventually. (I keep a reef fish tank as well and I’ve definitely seen opposing “right answers” debated. Thanks for the input though. I appreciate all perspectives in order to get to a sustainable scenario in my pond.


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    15. #75
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      So I also noticed this today when I was working on my filter setup.



      Some sort of eggs? Anyone recognize this?


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    16. #76
      RichToyBox's Avatar
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      Don't know what it is, but will say it doesn't appear to be snail, frog or toad, and doesn't really look like koi or goldfish.

      "Our goal is to assist with emergency and Koi health issues, as well as educate on best practices. Please help us gain a clear picture by giving the original poster time to answer our questions before offering opinions and suggested treatments."

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      Richard

    17. #77
      szweier is offline Member
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      Yea I’m not sure what it could be either.

      So do you all think I’d be crazy/stupid to get a couple of goldfish to add to my pond to see if they can survive the winter or is it too stressful to introduce them now?


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