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  • Results 1 to 13 of 13

    Thread: Bentonite Clay Page

    1. #1
      Gene's Avatar
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      Bentonite Clay Page

      Good morning everyone. On the http://koiclay.com/bentonite.html web page of my Koi Clay site I'm trying to show how safe and beneficial bentonite clay is for peoples koi and garden ponds.

      I would greatly appreciate it if you would take time to read that page and give me your honest opinion on how well I have accomplished it.

      As an incentive I will pick the 5 comments that I find most useful and award a 3 lb. jar of "Ultimate Koi Clay" shipped to them on me as soon as I get it back on the market. I hope it will be available by the middle of August.

      Sincerely,

      Gene Winstead
      Koi Clay, Ultimate Koi Clay
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      Gene




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    2. #2
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      Hi Gene,
      I read the article and, though interesting, I found it to be more of a history and scientific explanation of bentonite clay rather than an explanation of how safe and beneficial the clay is for ponds. I see it as more of a precourser to a following segment that focuses on practical usage for the average pond owner.
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    3. #3
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      Quote Originally Posted by GoldieGirl View Post
      Hi Gene,
      I read the article and, though interesting, I found it to be more of a history and scientific explanation of bentonite clay rather than an explanation of how safe and beneficial the clay is for ponds. I see it as more of a precourser to a following segment that focuses on practical usage for the average pond owner.
      Thank you, that is very well put. I'll add another page to that site. You are the first winner of a 3 lb. jar of Ultimate Koi Clay. I've attached an image but I'm waiting to gen the labels back from the printer, so I super imposed a small one on the jar. The actual labels will wrap around both sides half way and contain information.
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      Last edited by Gene; 07-22-2018 at 10:45 PM.
      Gene




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      Hi Gene...

      Unless I missed it, I don't see a simple explanation of how someone is supposed to use the Koi Clay in their pond. You should have a tab for " instructions ", or " how to use " , and give some guidance on recommended dosages. For example, " simply scatter X ounces of Koi Clay per 1000 gallons of pond , and repeat once per week " ( or whatever you recommend ) . I think some people mix with their koi food, and if so, how much is mixed ? I couldn't find any of this info on the web site.

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      Thank you, that is very well put. I'll add another page to that site. You are the first winner of a 3 lb. jar of Ultimate Koi Clay. I've attached an image but I'm waiting to gen the labels back from the printer, so I super imposed a small one on the jar. The actual labels will wrap around both sides half way and contain information.
      That's what I intend to do when I add the other page. Probably tonight in the wee hours, maybe sooner.
      Gene




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      It says can be used as toothpaste and also water softener, etc... maybe it would be good to also give some instruction s on how to do so. Also I also thought it would increase the hardness, so I'm wondering how it is used as a water softener?

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      Quote Originally Posted by kevin32 View Post
      It says can be used as toothpaste and also water softener, etc... maybe it would be good to also give some instruction s on how to do so. Also I also thought it would increase the hardness, so I'm wondering how it is used as a water softener?
      There will be no instructions on anything other than use with the ponding hobby. The amount of clay that you put into a pond will have no effect on the hardness of the water.
      Gene




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    8. #8
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      I'll include the instructions for use that I used for the original "Koi Clay" website.

      The Wayback Machine is an Internet archive. This link is to a page about how to use "Koi Clay". It is from 24 May 2002. https://web.archive.org/web/20020610...m:80/page2.htm At the bottom of the page you will see "Last modified on March 18, 2002"

      Also, if you read the home page you may find comments that are in some of the other bentonite products. There was one company that started a koi clay brand 2005 that literally copied and pasted everything on my site into his website. I recently found a dealer in Canada that is using my text to sell the Microbe-Lift bentonite clay. I'm writing this so you won't thing I've plagiarized another companies material.
      Gene




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    9. #9
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      Hi Gene:

      Nice to hear from you, I've only rarely checked in on this board over the last year or two.

      There's a typo, the first use of montmorillonite in the 3rd paragraph after "Warning" is misspelled...

      I spent a few years working on adapting montmorillonite clays to function as fungal toxin binding agents. The basic approach is common in cattle feeding operations, generally 1 - 3% by weight of clay is added to rations as a binding agent for aflatoxin. Aflatoxin is a potent carcinogen that is commonly produced by various Aspergillus molds, and it is a persistent member in the food chain. Many of the worldwide cases of liver cancer can be associated with aflatoxin exposure. In the EU, there are clays (the BASF product 'Novasil' is a big one) that can be sold as 'mycotoxin binding agents + anti-caking agents.' In the US, the FDA doesn't approve the mycotoxin binding label, so they can only be sold as anti-caking agents. Still, everyone knows what they're actually using them for - binding toxin to carry it out of the gut before it diffuses into the bloodstream. Fish are very sensitive to aflatoxin, so I believe this might be some of the advantage to having it as a feeding additive (aflatoxin is very common to corn and peanuts, less so to wheat and rice).

      One company shared information with me on their bentonite/montmorillonite screening, and found HUGE variations in the performance of various clays. Some were surprisingly quite contaminated with heavy metals and cyanides. In retrospect, this makes sense, given their high affinity for binding various molecules: if your bentonite mining operation is next to a high cyanide containing deposit, it will likely bind anything that has washed across.

      My work ended without improving the performance of the clays, but I ended up with a healthy respect for the potential they have in a variety of animal feed settings. It would help if folks would put more effort into quantifying their performance, but I think it is likely that the gains people are seeing (better whites, healthier fish, improved water quality) are probably real, and not the placebo effect from buying snake oil! I used up all of my research clays in my own pond over the last few years, but once again, nothing I could quantify as a benefit.

      Once again, great to hear you're back in the swing of things - the first DIY filter I ever built was your design from almost 12 years ago...

      best regards,

      -t

    10. #10
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      Quote Originally Posted by webted View Post
      Hi Gene:

      Nice to hear from you, I've only rarely checked in on this board over the last year or two.

      There's a typo, the first use of montmorillonite in the 3rd paragraph after "Warning" is misspelled...

      I spent a few years working on adapting montmorillonite clays to function as fungal toxin binding agents. The basic approach is common in cattle feeding operations, generally 1 - 3% by weight of clay is added to rations as a binding agent for aflatoxin. Aflatoxin is a potent carcinogen that is commonly produced by various Aspergillus molds, and it is a persistent member in the food chain. Many of the worldwide cases of liver cancer can be associated with aflatoxin exposure. In the EU, there are clays (the BASF product 'Novasil' is a big one) that can be sold as 'mycotoxin binding agents + anti-caking agents.' In the US, the FDA doesn't approve the mycotoxin binding label, so they can only be sold as anti-caking agents. Still, everyone knows what they're actually using them for - binding toxin to carry it out of the gut before it diffuses into the bloodstream. Fish are very sensitive to aflatoxin, so I believe this might be some of the advantage to having it as a feeding additive (aflatoxin is very common to corn and peanuts, less so to wheat and rice).

      One company shared information with me on their bentonite/montmorillonite screening, and found HUGE variations in the performance of various clays. Some were surprisingly quite contaminated with heavy metals and cyanides. In retrospect, this makes sense, given their high affinity for binding various molecules: if your bentonite mining operation is next to a high cyanide containing deposit, it will likely bind anything that has washed across.

      My work ended without improving the performance of the clays, but I ended up with a healthy respect for the potential they have in a variety of animal feed settings. It would help if folks would put more effort into quantifying their performance, but I think it is likely that the gains people are seeing (better whites, healthier fish, improved water quality) are probably real, and not the placebo effect from buying snake oil!

      Once again, great to hear you're back in the swing of things - the first DIY filter I ever built was your design from almost 12 years ago...

      best regards,

      -t
      Thank you for that post. I have sent you and email.

      Gene
      Gene




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    11. #11
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      Quote Originally Posted by kevin32 View Post
      It says can be used as toothpaste and also water softener, etc... maybe it would be good to also give some instruction s on how to do so. Also I also thought it would increase the hardness, so I'm wondering how it is used as a water softener?
      Wet your tooth brush and sprinkle clay on it.

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    12. #12
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      Quote Originally Posted by Billy View Post
      Wet your tooth brush and sprinkle clay on it.
      Lol. My remineralizing toothpaste recipe:

      1/2 cup coconut oil
      4 tsp. xylitol
      2 tsp. baking soda
      2 tsp koi clay
      1 tsp organic bone meal (for human consumption)
      1 tsp cinnomon
      bunch of drops of essential oils to taste (peppermint, orange, cinnamon etc.)
      Melt oil, stir in everything else, let oil harden again, use a little spoon to scoop out into mouth, brush.
      ________________________________________
      Cheers,
      Ci


    13. #13
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      Hi Gene,

      Does this effect the pond's pH? Is it on the market / available for purchase yet? Thank you!
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