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    Thread: Newbie here – tried to kill my pond. Help!

    1. #21
      icu2's Avatar
      icu2 is offline Administrator ~ WWKC Treasurer
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      Quote Originally Posted by RVAJim View Post
      Nancy, interesting. Now the skeptic in me (and former swimming pool service owner) is wondering how can measuring the salt content in water tell me how large my pond is, in gallons? I don't see the connection, although ya learn something new every day! (Too bad, when I got out of the pool business, I sold most of my stuff, including a very expensive salt meter.)

      That said, this is a very small pond, about 8 ft diameter for the round part, then maybe 3x5 for the rectangular part, although I'll go out and measure again after work. And the bottom is very flat. (Ordered the new filter and test kits btw...thanks !)
      By measuring the amount of existing (if any) salt concentration in the pond and then adding a known amount of salt,
      you can calculate the number of gallons. 1 pound of salt in 100 gallons of water will equal .12%, in 1000 gallons it will
      equal .012%, etc. So,

      -Measure the amount of salt in your pond now with a digital meter.

      -Add a known amount of salt, say 1 pound of salt per 100 gallons of what you estimate the pond volume to be, so
      in your case 9 pounds and let it completely dissolve preferably in flowing water (stream, waterfall, filter, skimmer, etc.)

      -Wait 12-24 hours to completely dissolve and measure again and subtract the original reading and use that measurement
      in the salt calculator "salinity change" box along with your known amount of salt (9 pounds) to calculate your actual gallons.

      http://www.koiphen.com/forums/koicalcs.php?do=calcsalt
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    2. #22
      IAmHolland is offline Junior Member
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      Quote Originally Posted by icu2 View Post
      By measuring the amount of existing (if any) salt concentration in the pond and then adding a known amount of salt,
      you can calculate the number of gallons. 1 pound of salt in 100 gallons of water will equal .12%, in 1000 gallons it will
      equal .012%, etc. So,

      -Measure the amount of salt in your pond now with a digital meter.

      -Add a known amount of salt, say 1 pound of salt per 100 gallons of what you estimate the pond volume to be, so
      in your case 9 pounds and let it completely dissolve preferably in flowing water (stream, waterfall, filter, skimmer, etc.)

      -Wait 12-24 hours to completely dissolve and measure again and subtract the original reading and use that measurement
      in the salt calculator "salinity change" box along with your known amount of salt (9 pounds) to calculate your actual gallons.

      http://www.koiphen.com/forums/koicalcs.php?do=calcsalt
      Also, the salt method takes into account the volume of water that is not seen, such as in the plumbing, pump, and filters. So, if you had 300 gallons of filtration and plumbing, that would be added in as well.

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