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  • Results 1 to 19 of 19

    Thread: DIY koi pond layout question.

    1. #1
      Pando56 is offline Junior Member
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      DIY koi pond layout question.

      hello, new to the forum and I am currently in the process of digging out my koi pond by hand. I have a question to ask all the pond experts. First, the specs of my pond: due to space constraints I'm making an L shape pond. the footprint will be 16'x16. Sides of the pond will be 4' deep, sloping to the 2 DB at 5' deep. capacity is around 5000 gallons and thinking of keeping 17 to 20 kois. my question is where to put the skimmer and tpr. I have two plans that I'm jogging around in my head, just need some input from you experience hobbyist
      layout 1
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      layout 2
      Name:  BP.jpg
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      thanks for looking.
      erik

    2. #2
      MCAsan's Avatar
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      Do you have to take a corner area for the pump room filter pit? Instead take it across one of the 16" walls so that you end up with rectangular pond. Two skimmers would be on the opposite corners from the bakki shower (not waterfall). Have the two drains and two skimmers feed an RDF (if budget allows) or two sieves or other good mechanical stage. If you are in a warm climate, pump all water to the shower. If you have to bypass the shower in your winters, then have a bead filter in. the filter room doing part of the work in the warm months and alll of the work in the cold months.

    3. #3
      birdman's Avatar
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      If this is going to be a liner pond you will have a real struggle with a conventional liner. Flat sheet liners just don't like inside corners. You can get a custom made drop in liner for this but the sides have to be straight and the bottom flat, not dished.
      If it was mw I would run the pond across the front and a long filter pit across the back. 16x10 pond and 16x6 filter pit.
      Also in your drawings neither TPR sketch would work good. You want circular flows around the TPRs like this.
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    4. #4
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      as you can see from the responses an L shaped pond is difficult to "sweep" with the return water.
      But what in the world are TPR's being discussed in a flat-sided pond? without a curved surface (like that in a vortex chamber where the term Tangential is correctly used. The returns are simply "PR" not "TPR." And keeping with the Tangential aspect a perfectly round pond is what you should be thinking of when you design a pond that you want to have stay clean. Any deviation from that creates turbulence...the more deviation the greater turbulence. The "L" shaped pond is so far removed from a circle pond that dead areas will not be possibly removed by PRs.
      Now where should your PRs go?
      One in the lower right pointing left
      one in the far left upper corner pointing right.
      one in the topmost left corner pointing right
      one in the far right upper corner pointing down
      "Those aren't poodles. They're Dobermans with afros."

    5. #5
      Pando56 is offline Junior Member
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      Thanks for the input. I guess i was trying to set up the returns while prioritizing the flow to the skimmer. But i guess it should account for the bottom drain as well. And by the way the pond will be concrete

    6. #6
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      Welcome and thanks for joining Koiphen!

      Tpr's are normally about 10-18" from the pond floor and when they're that deep I know mine don't effect the flow
      to my skimmers much. If you have some prevailing wind blowing across the pond I think that has a lot to where the
      skimmers are best placed. Set the tpr's to assist the BD's.

      Enjoy the forum and I hope you'll share the build when it gets underway!!
      --Steve
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    7. #7
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      Two things to consider with skimmer placement. Direction of prevailing wind- and aeration. You do not indicate if any air stones or aerated bottom drains will be used, but they will significantly affect the functionality of the skimmer. If there is no aeration, then as noted by ICU2 wind will be a significant factor, skimmer should be placed downwind. One final note, rarely will a single skimmer provide the desired sweeping of the pond surface.

    8. #8
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      Quote Originally Posted by kby103 View Post
      One final note, rarely will a single skimmer provide the desired sweeping of the pond surface.

      Totally agreed! That why to put skimmers in the corners of the wall opposite the shower return. You can get black skimmers with 4" ports on the bottom for good gravity feeding to the filter pit.

    9. #9
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      Man, I'm not a professional pond builder but having built my own pond this past fall I gotta say the L-shape looks daunting. If you absolutely need an L-shape then here are my two-bit suggestions:

      - Three bottom drains each with an 8' diameter sweep area
      - You need at least two skimmers. Assuming you have aerated bottom drains, one needs to be in the bottom right corner which I know is going to make it stick out into the open but perhaps you can hide it somehow

      Back to the shape... What would be the ramifications of changing the footprint slightly and making it rectangular 16 x 11 x 5.5 (5' at the edges and 6' at the bottom drains)? You'd still get 7000+ gallons and would not have the L shape issues. You could probably get away with only 2 bottom drains in that scenario (although 3 would still be ideal IMO). Probably still need two skimmers at the corners opposite the shower.

    10. #10
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      The 'dauntingness" of an "L" pond should not be dismissed. I would have said much more about the choice IF it were a choice. It seems the pond has to be made to fit the space?
      and the post telling you about wind and aeration being the consideration for skimmers is spot on.
      "Those aren't poodles. They're Dobermans with afros."

    11. #11
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      I would also i like to build a rectangular pond (would be much easier on me). But made a deal with wify, i get to have a koi pond but she wants it to look a certain way. This is what she wantsName:  contemporary-japanese-style-garden-fish-pond-for-residential-backyard.jpg
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    12. #12
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      "Those aren't poodles. They're Dobermans with afros."

    13. #13
      tbullard is offline Senior Member
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      That's an easy one. Just make 2 separate water chambers. The long rectangular section is pond and the small square section is a shallower water garden. You can have the rectangle properly filtered for koi and keep the lilies and other plants in the square section with a separate water/filter system.

    14. #14
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      Quote Originally Posted by Pando56 View Post
      I would also i like to build a rectangular pond (would be much easier on me). But made a deal with wify, i get to have a koi pond but she wants it to look a certain way. This is what she wants
      Neat formal design.
      It'd be interesting to see how it's built structurally and maintained.
      --Steve
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    15. #15
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      Make the deck full length of the pond, 6' wide x 16' long, and make the interior of the water 6 feet deep flat bottom, 10' wide x 16' long makes a 7200 gallon pond with a raised bridge across the center of the pond. Filtration below the deck in 6'x6'x16' chamber (no shower, unless a raised area in back by the fence?). Inside measurements still 16' wide by 16' long. Just a thought.

    16. #16
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      Quote Originally Posted by Pando56 View Post
      I would also i like to build a rectangular pond (would be much easier on me). But made a deal with wify, i get to have a koi pond but she wants it to look a certain way. This is what she wantsName:  contemporary-japanese-style-garden-fish-pond-for-residential-backyard.jpg
Views: 264
Size:  114.9 KB
      If you do a flat bottom and straight block or concrete walls I can make you a drop in liner that would eliminate the inside corner problem with a conventional liner.

    17. #17
      Pond,James_Pond's Avatar
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      Sell her on the rectangle pond with deck concept. Filter pit under the deck. Bog plants "next to" the pond, looking like they're in the pond. It will work better and save you thousands in upfront cost.

      steve
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    18. #18
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      Explain the concept of "Bog plants next to pond looking like they are in pond'. What is a bog plant? Sounds interesting.

    19. #19
      Pond,James_Pond's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by malatu View Post
      Explain the concept of "Bog plants next to pond looking like they are in pond'. What is a bog plant? Sounds interesting.
      Bog plants are reeds, cattails, marginals and such that thrive in the mud around and in a pond. Arrowhead and aquatic mint are two that I have. So if you design the pond with that in mind, you can have bog plants that hang over the edge of the pond and look like they're part of the pond.

      steve
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