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  • Results 1 to 9 of 9

    Thread: Spring Again...

    1. #1
      little_mikey is offline Senior Member
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      Spring Again...

      This week it should hit 80 (Florida). Was worried that all the plants that got whomped by Irma might not survive the winter. So far things are looking up.

      My "ugly baby" even survived: (Nymphaea amazonum)
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      Caerulea, Elegans, Jongkolnee
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    2. #2
      gray cat's Avatar
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      Good to hear all is well with your plants. Glad Spring is in your area now.
      Nancy



      Koiphen 2012 Koi Person of the Year!

    3. #3
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      Great job saving them, Mikey!
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    4. #4
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      I would not have thought that water plants and lilies would have any problems wintering over in Orlando.
      "most men lead lives of quiet desperation and go to the grave with the song
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    5. #5
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      Quote Originally Posted by gander View Post
      I would not have thought that water plants and lilies would have any problems wintering over in Orlando.
      In theory...

      I'm just grateful things didn't get swept away in Irma. I was pretty worried about a couple of my harries that had oak tree limbs fall into the rhizhomes (cracking them). I also don't always achieve success at tubering. Like Craig and others said that hydrocallis tuber... but I was heavy handed with the fertilizer this year and ended up with an overgrowth rhizome.



      Bottom line is I was really busting my hump in November trying to clean up Irma stuff. The positive thing is that there are less trees to shade the ponds I guess. Overall I am starting 1 month earlier than last year (sprouted tubers last week of January). At this rate I am going to have grown a gigantea, and tuber it before June even gets here. I even have 2 E. ferrrox seedlings right now. I have no doubt they will complete their life cycle and burn out in no time.

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      Many thanks again Frank for the generosity. The elegans pup sprouted from the tuber has 2 flower buds already. Also was able to grow the orchid star long enough last winter to charge up the tuber with some fertilizer/sun. Just amazing how vigorous star type lilies are.
      Last edited by little_mikey; 2 Weeks Ago at 11:39 AM.

    6. #6
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      Craig and others don't make this stuff up...the Hydrocallis do indeed tuber. < g > We had a mild winter here, even the lilies in the farm pond only missed a few days of blooming in a cold snap shortly after New Year....but the N. prolifera never missed a beat.

      I had just let them run wild, but now it seems I'll need the pond, as it is deeper than my others and used to grow Vics. I had sworn I was done with Vics, but got a call yesterday from someone promised species seed and has asked for my help in growing ama...ama is a bear to grow and they want to split the seed among proven growers.... Anyway, I needed to clean the pond out in prep and while tossing the prolifera, I found Vic seed from my last season starting to volunteer.

      I swear this is my last Vic season, but am excited they are trying to get the Vic Conservancy up and running again.
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      Craig

    7. #7
      little_mikey is offline Senior Member
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      @Craig
      Glad to see you are up and running for the year. Yeah my amazon is going crazy.
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      I just don't think I was able to stress my plants adequately last year. I switched to shallow wide bowls as pots last year and got the best bloom frequency I have ever had... My thought was keeping everyone shallow and dry would make tubers. It worked well for the "bunching" varieties like colorata/nag-kwag/jongkolnee etc. but not so well for those who prefer to make overgrowth rhizhomes. This year I am doing very small tight pots as I am graduating university in summer.

      I wanted to ask you, (and others) if removing the main crown of an overgrowth rhizome will stimulate new eyes to form. Last year I snapped a 4 inch long overgrowth rhizome off a Terri Dunn I was repotting. I discarded the hunk of tissue in a pond and it grew like 3 new plants off it. I and others observed this behavior in hardies... but I didn't think it worked for tropicals. I seem to remember a post on Victoria-adventure about Albert-Greenburg with 100s of babies popping off a "tuber". Then this month Rich Sacher had a social media post showing a pic of a tissue cultured rhizome of a tropical with hundreds of plantlets. I guess my question is in theory if a hunk of rhizome didn't die outright from the trauma of being snapped, would the apical dominance be nulled out (thus allowing scores of babies to pop up)?

      I am strongly considering setting up a tissue culture this year if I have time...

    8. #8
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      I wish you had pictures of the separated crown, but if it produced plantlets...there had to be apical meristem tissue left on it. I should have time to root around the ponds tomorrow and find a tuber or two to show what I mean. The 'Albert Greenberg' was one in Sean Stevens' pond, as I recall. Profuse plantlet production does occur....it is also common in 'Miami Rose'...but generally considered to be problematic; better a few healthy offshoots, than a plethora of weak ones.

      Tissue culture is another process all together. In TC, only meristem cells are harvested and various auxins introduced into the agar culture, that result in cell differentiation. It ain't easy...you need to come up with the proper hormones and timing and it needs to be done in a sterile environment. The best would be a laminar flow hood, but with care a glove box will do. Primary issue, is the tissue sample has to be clean, and submerged aquatic plant samples usually contain "pond" water, a worrisome source of contamination. If you want to try your hand, I have a simple hood designs given me by an acquaintance who is a Bio professor at NC State and a manual on various tissue culture protocols from a Prof in Australia.

      I would simply say...unless you have something new, valuable and slow to propagate...it is not going to be cost efficient for propagating currently available cultivars.
      "Knowledge speaks, but wisdom listens." ~ Jimi Hendrix

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      Craig

    9. #9
      little_mikey is offline Senior Member
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      Quote Originally Posted by CraigP View Post
      I wish you had pictures of the separated crown, but if it produced plantlets...there had to be apical meristem tissue left on it. I should have time to root around the ponds tomorrow and find a tuber or two to show what I mean. The 'Albert Greenberg' was one in Sean Stevens' pond, as I recall. Profuse plantlet production does occur....it is also common in 'Miami Rose'...but generally considered to be problematic; better a few healthy offshoots, than a plethora of weak ones.

      Tissue culture is another process all together. In TC, only meristem cells are harvested and various auxins introduced into the agar culture, that result in cell differentiation. It ain't easy...you need to come up with the proper hormones and timing and it needs to be done in a sterile environment. The best would be a laminar flow hood, but with care a glove box will do. Primary issue, is the tissue sample has to be clean, and submerged aquatic plant samples usually contain "pond" water, a worrisome source of contamination. If you want to try your hand, I have a simple hood designs given me by an acquaintance who is a Bio professor at NC State and a manual on various tissue culture protocols from a Prof in Australia.

      I would simply say...unless you have something new, valuable and slow to propagate...it is not going to be cost efficient for propagating currently available cultivars.
      I fell like there might have been a little bit of that kind of tissue around the "rim" but honestly the hunk of rhizome was flat on the end like a piece of corn snapped in half. Like I cracked the piece of with the intention of flinging it in the compost pile and missed (landed in a pond)... There was a good 1-2 inch of the rhizome still attached to the host/mother plant I took the rhizome from (no ill effects). Point being that scrap seemed like it should have immediately rotted not made a new plant.

      Im pretty broke busy as a graduating engineer... Probably wouldn't even have the space for a diy laminar cabinet. My thought was that although being aquatic/dirty... tubers/rhizhomes could withstand a real beating chemically. Maybe I could really abuse the material when sterilizing it. There are things I could do to a calloused over rhizome that I couldn't do to a cutting. My biggest concern is I don't know of any publicly available protocols for nymphaea. Also not really sure where the meristem regions are so as not obliterate them on cutting. I also have no idea what hormonal/medium environment would make a waterlily tissue differentiate. Heck I am not sure how cellularly active a dormant tissue like that would be.

      As far as cost it seems like there are $50 kits for teachers/classrooms. TBH I would probably only need to buy some MS medium + BAP Cytokinin... I guess probably the biggest plus is the lack of space... I mean I can comfortably grow a mess of lilies by vegetative means... but it takes a lot of space/time.

      Really I just like learning new things. If I could just consistently repeat my little accident with the Terri dunn rhizome that would be significant for me. Also kinda wonder about forcing vivip leaves in stubborn varieties...

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