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  • Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
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    Thread: can I fit all this in my 10x10' F.pit, and is this the best way to do it?

    1. #41
      vipertom1970 is offline Senior Member
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      No, lath will not add any strength to any wall or to serve as reinforcement. Masonry walls below ground holding up just one side of dirt or a slope is considered a retaining wall and requires additional reinforcement and sometimes required larger block.
      Last edited by vipertom1970; 1 Week Ago at 01:58 PM.

    2. #42
      tom66 is offline Member
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      today I went to my lumber supplier to price knockout bond beam blocks and lintel blocks. My latest idea was to fill one cell in the middle of the 10' wall and tie that into a bond beam with rebar throughout the perimeter (and/or maybe do one horizontal reinforced beam all around the wall at its midpoint). The salesperson asked me what I was building and we got to talking. He insisted that my plan was not a good one because forces into each of those 10' walls (6' high) would be too much. He would fill one cell in each corner and bury a long threaded rod into the footing. He would also fill one cell at mid point (with vertical rebar tied into the footing) and would bolt 2x8" treated into those rods. He would also tie perpendicular walls with some 2bys. I guess one way to do it would be to place one 2x10" (or bigger, or doubled) from one mid point to the one on its opposite side, and another perpendicular to it. Another way would be to have several (smaller ones) every 2 or 3 feet, installed in the same grid-like shape. He figures that that would hold those forces (soil pressure pushing inwards) much better than my plan. What do you guys think?
      The guy in question is probably not a structural engineer but has been involved in the business a long time (he was there 17 years ago when we build our house) and was definitely talking like he knows the subject.
      What do you guys think?

    3. #43
      vipertom1970 is offline Senior Member
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      why can you just use city standard for masonry wall and footing up to 6' high(pre-engineered). every city has city standard details for a masonry wall.

    4. #44
      BroHay is online now Member
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      The above detail I referenced was a first tier of a retaining wall system that was 3 tiers with 8' setbacks / tier and a total of 26' tall.

      Each tier was over excavated 12' back and special engineered fill was put in its place with 95%+ compaction minimum needed to pass soils test.

      The next tier footing was then dug in the lowers compacted soil with the same 95%+ compaction before the footing placed. Same for the 3rd tier.

      Point is, 36' from the face of the lower tier was compacted just to hold back the forces @ hand. Not to mention the weep holes, French drains, and site drainage culverts that were throughout the wall.

      I would look at your city's standards for retaining walls as suggested and build that per detail. At least you know that things will hopefully stay in place.

      Though not mandatory, I will not even mention inspections. Under a homeowners permit, it would give peace of mind to the future owner should you decide to sell that things were done in a professional manner.

      Adam

    5. #45
      tsippel is offline Senior Member
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      Tom I guess it's Tom
      Stay on course I've built bigger with 3000 lb fish load with a lower budget and the water is crystal clear
      Clear water was the hardest (3years)
      Treating fish is cheep
      Don't let people get you down
      The trick to filtration is big plumbing
      bottom drain needs to be 8" pipe
      Rdf filter
      Moving bed media is pricey to power
      Shower tower is what I would use

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