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    Thread: My Koi are confused by the floating pellets in their new indoor home

    1. #1
      Bill_Stock is offline Senior Member
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      My Koi are confused by the floating pellets in their new indoor home

      I purchased some GF from the garden centre in July, but when I brought them indoors recently it was obvious that 3 of the 4 are actually Koi. I fed them floating pellets in the pond, but they would never come up to eat when anyone was around. They have always been skittish, even the one GF. I actually lost one to a Raccoon I think, so that might explain their behaviour.

      I thought they might freak out being in the indoor tank, but they have been fine. But they will not come up to eat their floating pellets. I'm not sure if they are bothered by the lights or just don't want to eat when anyone is around. The odd thing is that I had one very old GF that I left in the tank. It also would not come up to eat, but I assume it was blind or senile, but now that it has friends again it is coming up to eat. But the Koi still won't follow it's lead. I will try feeding them their pond pellets to see if that helps or try some sinking pellets.

      Any idea what's up with these guys? Just shy?

      Thx

    2. #2
      kevin32's Avatar
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      I would feed some sinking to get them motivated to eat. then try to throw some of the floating food.

    3. #3
      icu2's Avatar
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      If you just moved them I'd just give them time. Everything is brand new and their first
      instinct is survival. They don't know if they'll be eaten or not if they fearlessly rise to the
      surface so I'd be patient. They won't starve to death. Let them get used to seeing you and
      their new environment and not being eaten.
      --Steve
      Find more about Weather in Poulsbo, WA

      "It is far better to be alone, than to be in bad company." --George Washington

    4. #4
      Bill_Stock is offline Senior Member
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      Quote Originally Posted by kevin32 View Post
      I would feed some sinking to get them motivated to eat. then try to throw some of the floating food.
      Thanks, we were expecting GF, so were a little surprised by the size when we saw them up close. The wife commented that the one guy was big enough to eat. They grew a lot in just four months; I guess that explains where the 15 pounds of food went. Although the skimmer sucked up a portion of that amount.

      I posted a pic elsewhere, but here's a pic of one of the smaller ones. That's the one GF of the bunch on the left. Excuse the dirty glass.
      Attached Images Attached Images  

    5. #5
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      try adding a background so the koi are not as sketchy to eat. koi seem to stress and not like being seen all the time through the glass. that's what o have found anyway. the ochiba looks pretty nice though.

    6. #6
      cindy's Avatar
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      Be sure there is a top on the tank, koi will jump
      My opinions in ER and on this forum are mine only. Use my advice at your own discretion.

      "Our goal is to assist with emergency and Koi health issues, as well as educate on best practices. Please help us gain a clear picture by giving the original poster time to answer our questions before offering opinions and suggested treatments."


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    7. #7
      Bill_Stock is offline Senior Member
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      Quote Originally Posted by kevin32 View Post
      try adding a background so the koi are not as sketchy to eat. koi seem to stress and not like being seen all the time through the glass. that's what o have found anyway. the ochiba looks pretty nice though.
      Thanks for the background tip.

      I paid about $60 CDN for these 5 'GF' when I bought them. I don't feel so bad about that price now.

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      Bill_Stock is offline Senior Member
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      Quote Originally Posted by cindy View Post
      Be sure there is a top on the tank, koi will jump
      Thanks, no jumping is allowed.

    9. #9
      Bill_Stock is offline Senior Member
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      I tried feeding them some of their pond pellets and it definitely got them interested, but they did not find it in the brief time I watched them. It always amazes me how good their sense of smell is, as they could smell this stuff in the pond when I fed them. Zeigler growth food in the pond.

    10. #10
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      Quote Originally Posted by Bill_Stock View Post
      I tried feeding them some of their pond pellets and it definitely got them interested, but they did not find it in the brief time I watched them. It always amazes me how good their sense of smell is, as they could smell this stuff in the pond when I fed them. Zeigler growth food in the pond.
      funny I feed my fish saki hikari growth. even my cat smells it and starts to eat it. bad kitty.. I throw hikari wheat germ in and my fish hardly react. then throw some saki growth in and they go nuts. fish have a great sense of smell and vibrations without need to see.

    11. #11
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      I have a similar tale and would appreciate any comments. I received a few small koi (4-5") a few weeks ago and placed them in my pond. Here in Seattle we had a cold snap and the water plummeted to 44 degrees within the past week. I was concerned about these youngins making it through the winter so my very local friend Monte McQuade said bringing them indoors (to my garage) for the winter wouldn't be a bad idea. I purchased a plastic stock feeding trough on Tuesday and put about 35 gals of pond water in it, captured the fish and brought them to the tank. I placed a 150w heater in there, added an external pump and a few airstones. After about 30 hours the temp rose to a toasty 65 or so. Since I'd only had the fish for two weeks in my pond, they never ate anything that I could tell, which may have been attributed to the water being about 50 when they were introduced. So here's a comment I'll share, and a question. Comment - after being in the tank for nearly three days, they finally started eating this morning. I used some Tetra floating pond sticks and everything is gone. It seems the warmer water really jump started their appetites. Question #1 - with warm water like this, should I plan on feeding them daily? Do those of you in much warmer climates feed your koi daily? Question #2 - I came out to the garage this morning and found one of them on the floor. A quick inspection showed he was still breathing so I quickly and gently lifted him off the concrete and placed him in the tank. He didn't look so well over the first hour, but five hours later he appears to be back to his chipper self. I'll be keeping a close eye on him for the next several days, but is there something I should do proactively to help him? I'm not seeing any outward or obvious problems. But I'm also going to get some netting material right away and get a cover on the tank. I'd never seen one jump before so now know to not take any chances!! Thanks in advance, Marty

    12. #12
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      Quote Originally Posted by MartyDopps View Post
      I have a similar tale and would appreciate any comments. I received a few small koi (4-5") a few weeks ago and placed them in my pond. Here in Seattle we had a cold snap and the water plummeted to 44 degrees within the past week. I was concerned about these youngins making it through the winter so my very local friend Monte McQuade said bringing them indoors (to my garage) for the winter wouldn't be a bad idea. I purchased a plastic stock feeding trough on Tuesday and put about 35 gals of pond water in it, captured the fish and brought them to the tank. I placed a 150w heater in there, added an external pump and a few airstones. After about 30 hours the temp rose to a toasty 65 or so. Since I'd only had the fish for two weeks in my pond, they never ate anything that I could tell, which may have been attributed to the water being about 50 when they were introduced. So here's a comment I'll share, and a question. Comment - after being in the tank for nearly three days, they finally started eating this morning. I used some Tetra floating pond sticks and everything is gone. It seems the warmer water really jump started their appetites. Question #1 - with warm water like this, should I plan on feeding them daily? Do those of you in much warmer climates feed your koi daily? Question #2 - I came out to the garage this morning and found one of them on the floor. A quick inspection showed he was still breathing so I quickly and gently lifted him off the concrete and placed him in the tank. He didn't look so well over the first hour, but five hours later he appears to be back to his chipper self. I'll be keeping a close eye on him for the next several days, but is there something I should do proactively to help him? I'm not seeing any outward or obvious problems. But I'm also going to get some netting material right away and get a cover on the tank. I'd never seen one jump before so now know to not take any chances!! Thanks in advance, Marty
      it is what it is now. but next time try heating them up slowly. like 3 degrees a day. 15 degrees is a big change on 30 hours.

    13. #13
      KoiRun's Avatar
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      Lol, I knew he was going to jump! Ask me how I know. My yamabuki jumped twice and was found almost dry and not breathing. I threw her back in the water and she started to breath and swim like she had a stroke. That was 2 years ago. She did not seem to have suffered any kind of brain damage. I started to net then. Koi will tend to jump in first few days of a new environment or if they don't like the water parameters. Marty, why leave them in the garage when you can enjoy them indoors with you. This was my set up by the kitchen (set up strategically while the wife was on vacation). I miss that little indoor tank (not). Enjoy.
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cN11FobuzoM
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    14. #14
      kevin32's Avatar
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      I've had koi jump out as well. I put water on the cement and then took the koi off it. the slime coat was dry so dont want to peel it off.

    15. #15
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      To KoiRun, man, you've got some really friendly fish! Not sure how serious you were about bringing them into the house, but my wife would absolutely kill me. She's be tolerant at best with this whole venture that I started a mere 10 weeks ago. Besides, fish water and accompanying filtration systems are pretty smelly. And if anyone wants to provide constructive feedback about that, I'm all ears!
      Last edited by MartyDopps; 11-10-2017 at 06:37 PM. Reason: Additional info

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      Kevin, thanks for the feedback. In hindsight maybe the 150 watt heater was too much? I've got it on it's absolute lowest setting, so the water temp won't go any lower. And I completely get what you're saying about the quick timeframe. Thanks much.

    17. #17
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      Quote Originally Posted by MartyDopps View Post
      Kevin, thanks for the feedback. In hindsight maybe the 150 watt heater was too much? I've got it on it's absolute lowest setting, so the water temp won't go any lower. And I completely get what you're saying about the quick timeframe. Thanks much.
      the 150 watt is not to much it is the lowest settin at 67 degrees. can either use a timer in the heater or buy a digital controller that can be set at much lower temp. just for future info...

    18. #18
      RichToyBox's Avatar
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      Be sure to get a filter system set up, and check water parameters almost daily until the filter cycles, particularly ammonia and nitrite. As long as ammonia and nitrite are present, resist feeding. For ammonia, get an SeaChem Ammonia Alert card to know when the ammonia is toxic, and treat with one of the ammonia binding dechlor products like Safe, Cloram-X, Prime, etc. to put the ammonia into a non-toxic form. Once nitrites are found, add salt at a rate of about 1 pound per 100 gallons, and get a salt pen or TDS meter and keep the salt at a level of about 0.1%, 1.0ppt until the nitrites reduce to zero. Once both ammonia and nitrite are zero, then feed as much and as often as you want, as long as ammonia and nitrite stays at zero.

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    19. #19
      MartyDopps is offline Member
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      Quote Originally Posted by RichToyBox View Post
      Be sure to get a filter system set up, and check water parameters almost daily until the filter cycles, particularly ammonia and nitrite. As long as ammonia and nitrite are present, resist feeding. For ammonia, get an SeaChem Ammonia Alert card to know when the ammonia is toxic, and treat with one of the ammonia binding dechlor products like Safe, Cloram-X, Prime, etc. to put the ammonia into a non-toxic form. Once nitrites are found, add salt at a rate of about 1 pound per 100 gallons, and get a salt pen or TDS meter and keep the salt at a level of about 0.1%, 1.0ppt until the nitrites reduce to zero. Once both ammonia and nitrite are zero, then feed as much and as often as you want, as long as ammonia and nitrite stays at zero.
      Thanks very much, Richard. I checked my water parameters yesterday, ammonia was .25, both NO2 and NO3 were at zero. Since a 45 gallon tub is essentially an aquarium, is there anything wrong about using something like a Tetra submersible filter? And I'll study this additional information as well. Thanks again.

    20. #20
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      Quote Originally Posted by MartyDopps View Post
      Thanks very much, Richard. I checked my water parameters yesterday, ammonia was .25, both NO2 and NO3 were at zero. Since a 45 gallon tub is essentially an aquarium, is there anything wrong about using something like a Tetra submersible filter? And I'll study this additional information as well. Thanks again.
      well there is nothing right about using submersible filters. will be hard to remove the ammonia as the ammonia is still there in the submersible filter. I would at least use a waterfall filter with some padding. better yet a filter like a biostep10 from matala would be more suitable

      not being negative but just trying to inform..i don't mean to be to harsh.
      Last edited by kevin32; 11-10-2017 at 10:25 PM.

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