• Amused
  • Angry
  • Annoyed
  • Awesome
  • Bemused
  • Cocky
  • Cool
  • Crazy
  • Crying
  • Depressed
  • Down
  • Drunk
  • Embarrased
  • Enraged
  • Friendly
  • Geeky
  • Godly
  • Happy
  • Hateful
  • Hungry
  • Innocent
  • Meh
  • Piratey
  • Poorly
  • Sad
  • Secret
  • Shy
  • Sneaky
  • Tired
  • Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst ... 2345
    Results 81 to 96 of 96

    Thread: "Pond"ering

    1. #81
      matherfish's Avatar
      matherfish is offline Senior Member
      This user has no status.
       
      Feeling:
      ----
       
      Join Date
      Jun 2006
      Location
      Nashville, TN
      Posts
      12,238
      Today I have been thinking about the names of plants. For years I have bought plants for our home's landscaping, and most of the time I did not keep up with the "variety" of the plants I bought. It did not matter to me, I just liked the look. I believe that most of the ponders who come on Koiphen are that way. Most only have a few varieties of plants and many do not have room for a lot of plants. These people who enjoy the hobby but are not consumed by it. I want to say to those people, "thank you!" You provide many great assets to our hobby. I wonder if many of our "non-members" who view on KP as guests do not sign up to be members because they can not contribute to the program. They may think that they only have a small pond, or only a few fish, or their fish are only mutts, etc. If you are one of these people, please understand that you are important to our hobby. Your questions help us to ponder new answers, share new information, or even remind us of old information. Your experiences also remind us of our own experiences throughout our years in the hobby.
      We should not expect everyone to know the names of every plant. there are thousands of named water lilies alone. I understand the frustration because, although I have had koi for years, I do not know the names of the varieties. If you are someone who wants to keep up with the identity of your plants, that is great. But if you only want to know it is a red bloom or a pink bloom, etc. that is good also. We only ask that you not try to identify your plant later because it looks like something that you have seen. It is better to call it a "red blooming hardy" as to say it is "Attraction" when it may be a "Burgundy Princess." Many plants are very similar so identifying one is not easy unless you have a great difference in your varieties. Obviously, if you have a yellow "Charlene Strawn" and a pink "Pink Sensation" and a white "Perry's Double White" but you call them red, pink and white you can still distinguish them if you have kept the names somewhere. If you have Joey Tomicek, Sunrise and Sulphurea the id is not easy. For the vast majority of ponders, you want the plant you get to be the plant you wanted, but since you are not planning on reselling them remembering the names is unimportant. If the pics are in the correct order, you will see Joey Tomicek, Sunrise and Suphurea.
      I have plants that I call "lost tags," and sell them as such. They are "named" varieties of plants that because of various factors, the name tags have faded or something has happened to the tags, and I am not sure of which exact variety the plant is. Lots of ponders like the "surprise lily" as they are sold at a lower cost. Almost every wholesaler, especially hybridizers, sell unnamed lilies according to color of bloom. These are generally the plants that came from their hybrids that they did not think were worth naming. They are what might be called "culls" or "seconds" in other industries. I am not disparaging them, but pointing out the difference between a "lost tag" and these lilies. When I look at the beautiful blooms of tMike's lilies and he tells me that many of them will be culled out, I am looking for his garbage bin! I understand his not wanting to put anything but the best into the hobby, but I do not envy his having to make those decisions.
      So as I look at the assortment of lilies in my ponds, I am reminded of the vast variety of plants in our hobby and appreciate the tremendous number of ponders with small or larger ponds whose interest in the hobby has created the desire and accessibility of all of these varieties.
      Happy "pond"ering!
      Attached Images Attached Images    
      Sunfire Hardy Water Lily now available
      [/B]
      See my Pro Seller store on Koiphen[B]

      TN Department of Agriculture Inspected and Certified
      for over 15 years!





      “People don't care how much you know until they know how much you care”
      ― Zig Ziglar

    2. #82
      matherfish's Avatar
      matherfish is offline Senior Member
      This user has no status.
       
      Feeling:
      ----
       
      Join Date
      Jun 2006
      Location
      Nashville, TN
      Posts
      12,238
      Today's thoughts are on creating hybrids. We are enjoying the rewards of the creation of hybrids with the parentage of a hardy, and a tropical lily, unheard of just a few years ago.
      I was in a discussion a few days ago with a few hybridizers and we were discussing various varieties to try crossing and the result we would hope to obtain. I am partial to reds, so that was on my mind when I suggested a few crosses to hopefully get a true red HXT. Since then, I have thought about what would be the perfect hybrid lily.
      In hybridizing roses, for instance, they have not only tried to create larger blooms, or new colors, or multi-petaled blooms, but they have also bred for more disease resistant varieties. Other plants have been hybridized to enhance certain traits as well.
      Wouldn't it be great, though impossible, if we could create a hybrid from a lily crossed with a citronella plant that would not only have a beautiful bloom, but would survive in a pond, and keep mosquitoes away? Or maybe a cross between a marigold plant and a lily that would keep China Marker moths away, keeping the cursed "sandwich man" worms from our ponds? Maybe it would keep aphids away as well!
      But as I ponder and return to reality, what would a perfect lily look like? Our answers would probably be a varied as the number of lilies already in existence and beyond. There is no "universal" perfect choice.
      Sure, I am dreaming of the impossible, but isn't it pleasant to think about? What would you like for your "perfect" lily to be?
      Happy "pond'ering!
      Sunfire Hardy Water Lily now available
      [/B]
      See my Pro Seller store on Koiphen[B]

      TN Department of Agriculture Inspected and Certified
      for over 15 years!





      “People don't care how much you know until they know how much you care”
      ― Zig Ziglar

    3. #83
      little_mikey is offline Senior Member
      This user has no status.
       
      Feeling:
      ----
       
      Join Date
      Mar 2017
      Location
      Orlando FL
      Posts
      119
      The pursuit of so many different perfect waterlilies is evident in the wide variety of hybrids out there. Most people have a different "secret sauce" they like to use. Ampla makes massive tough hybrids... Aussie capensis can make nice mottling... Flavovirens for cold tolerance/ flower height...

      I am partial to minuta. Also like my blue gigantea. Also like flavovirens... My goal is to make a lily for any idiot with a tub basically. I want to make a lily that is easy/compact. I also want to make a lily that has its own merits besides ease/size... a show stopper in its own right.

      I like Dauben... but the reason it sticks around is its ease of care. It doesn't hold a matchstick to Red Flare. I find it hard to pick a favorite, but I rather like Foxfire. Foxfire also overwinters better than many lilies yet it can go a few rounds with Aussies and Victorias in terms of being a show stopper.

      I suppose in a fantasy world I would have the ISG progeny of Arcen Ciel and some red/pink viviparous tropical...

    4. #84
      matherfish's Avatar
      matherfish is offline Senior Member
      This user has no status.
       
      Feeling:
      ----
       
      Join Date
      Jun 2006
      Location
      Nashville, TN
      Posts
      12,238
      Mikey your comment as to an Arc-en-ciel cross has caused me to think about that today. An HXT cross with Arc-en-ciel looking pad would be fantastic, but I have not known of any full hardy crosses that have produced pads like the Arc-en-ciel pads.

      Today's thoughts also include the preparation of the minuta seedlings for the winter. These dainty little plants require a long time to grow to maturity and from what I understand, they take more than a season so need to continue growing over the winter. They have been placed in an aquarium, and I will put an aquarium heater in with them to keep them warm since they will be in my garage. Contemplating how that plants have to be treated according to their own needs and individual characteristics. I think about how often gardeners try to force plants to behave according to what is convenient for the gardener and then wonder why the plant died or did not flourish.

      I am also thinking about this coming winter. our last two winters have been moderate and some are concerned about this winter, expecting it to be harsh. Guess if we prepare for the worse we can rejoice with if it does not happen. I wonder how many here on KP use animals and insects and their behavior as a way to predict the winter weather? will you tell us about it and what you are seeing?
      Happy "pond"ering!
      Sunfire Hardy Water Lily now available
      [/B]
      See my Pro Seller store on Koiphen[B]

      TN Department of Agriculture Inspected and Certified
      for over 15 years!





      “People don't care how much you know until they know how much you care”
      ― Zig Ziglar

    5. #85
      matherfish's Avatar
      matherfish is offline Senior Member
      This user has no status.
       
      Feeling:
      ----
       
      Join Date
      Jun 2006
      Location
      Nashville, TN
      Posts
      12,238
      My 'pond"erings today deal with the need to recognize the uniqueness of ponding. As you can tell from many posts in "water gardening" here on KP, there are some plants that have been adapted to grow in ponds that are not naturally pond plants. Impatiens are among them. Banana plants are plants that like a frequent watering, but they are not truly water plants, but some varieties have been "trained" to grow in shallow water in pots. Some varieties of taro, or Elephant Ears, can grow in pots in shallow water, but other varieties cannot. Imperial Taro is an example of a taro that can grow in water, but Mickey Mouse taro is not, although it likes frequent watering. Can you just throw any land plant on the ground and expect it to grow? Of course not! You must consider its needs and try to meet them.

      Pondering these things caused me to think about how many people confuse pond plants with land plants. I have seen people on Facebook and on water plant forums ask if plants such as lilies and lotuses can grow without being in soil. Can they grow simply as floaters? The nature of these plants is to grow in soil. They set roots in soil and get nutrients from them. How different that is from tiny floating plants such as azolla or duck weed, which grow simply floating on the water. Water hyacinth will grow and survive floating on the water, but if its roots can reach soil, it will take root in the soil. If there are sufficient nutrients in the water, it is perfectly content and happy to just float!

      I have found tubers growing in muck in the bottom of a pond, having been knocked out of a pot. I have had hardy lilies jump pot and grow in the muck in the bottom of a pond, as also I have had a lotus do this. But all of these still had roots growing in a medium, and were not simply growing in water without a soil of some kind for the plant to take root in. I would not deliberately just throw a tuber into a tub of water, even aged water, and expect it to grow. it may sprout and try to grow, but that is it's survival mechanism. It will not survive long, nor will it flourish and become the plant it could be.

      With this in mind, as you consider closing down your pond for the winter, consider the plants you want to survive and have next year. What are their needs and characteristics, and what will you need to do to make them happy? Make plans now to meet those needs.

      Happy "Pond"ering!
      Last edited by matherfish; 2 Weeks Ago at 12:16 AM.
      Sunfire Hardy Water Lily now available
      [/B]
      See my Pro Seller store on Koiphen[B]

      TN Department of Agriculture Inspected and Certified
      for over 15 years!





      “People don't care how much you know until they know how much you care”
      ― Zig Ziglar

    6. #86
      matherfish's Avatar
      matherfish is offline Senior Member
      This user has no status.
       
      Feeling:
      ----
       
      Join Date
      Jun 2006
      Location
      Nashville, TN
      Posts
      12,238
      Yesterday I went to a local independent aquarium store that also has pond fish and plants. While there, I saw they had four large Plecostomus for sale. These fish are used in aquariums because they are great algae eaters. They act much like catfish but they feed largely on algae. The large fish they had at the pet store were far too big for a normal aquarium as these were about 18 inches long and 6 inches across. They reminded me of one I had several years ago that I put in my pond.
      I would love to have one or two of these in each of my larger ponds to help keep algae out. My problem with my former inhabitant is that at the end of summer I had to take it out as they are a tropical fish and cannot live in cold water. I moved it into a pond in the greenhouse and put heaters in with it but it did not survive the winter. I guess the temperature of the water dropped too much, especially at night. My thoughts of this made me ask myself if maybe other have these fish in their ponds. Are you in areas where your pond water stays warm, or do you take them out and put them in a container for the winter? It would be nice not to have to use chemicals to fight algae and have a natural algae fighter. I know many use uv lights but those are expensive and many owners of smaller ponds or multiple ponds do not use them.
      Just pondering solutions for some of our ponding questions.
      Keep on "pond"ering!
      Sunfire Hardy Water Lily now available
      [/B]
      See my Pro Seller store on Koiphen[B]

      TN Department of Agriculture Inspected and Certified
      for over 15 years!





      “People don't care how much you know until they know how much you care”
      ― Zig Ziglar

    7. #87
      little_mikey is offline Senior Member
      This user has no status.
       
      Feeling:
      ----
       
      Join Date
      Mar 2017
      Location
      Orlando FL
      Posts
      119
      @matherfish
      Do plecos eat lilies? I know they rasp algae off surfaces of plants and do damage, but do they outright attack plants? They have a nice "prehistoric" appeal with all the armor. I like bichirs (air breathing fish from Africa) personally. Plecos are feral in Florida. They only tend to freeze to death in small ponds where the temps spike. In the rivers/retention areas they do ok.


      I have been reflecting on the planning it takes to get waterlilies going. Particularly winter prep. I think about winter in July. Hybridizing is a whole other level of prep. One has to grow sufficient biomass of each parent for the cross to get more chances of simultaneous blooms... Then one has to have the space to raise the seedlings. There is no way to predict which seedlings are the 2% that are useful... Its a real investment. Then other folks by the time they get the resources to hybridize, they already have acquired such a collection they are too busy to make crosses. Like if somebody gets their hands on N. thermarum or other rare species material they will be falling all over themselves to keep that stuff overwinter, when will they have time to make crosses? Really wish there were more people in the hobby so some of the responsibility in regard to keeping rare material going was diffused a bit.

    8. #88
      matherfish's Avatar
      matherfish is offline Senior Member
      This user has no status.
       
      Feeling:
      ----
       
      Join Date
      Jun 2006
      Location
      Nashville, TN
      Posts
      12,238
      Mikey, I do not believe the plecos eat plants. Eating the algae off of the plants probably reveals the damage to the plant that the algae does to it. I never noticed the pleco eating my lilies when I had the big one in my pond.
      Sunfire Hardy Water Lily now available
      [/B]
      See my Pro Seller store on Koiphen[B]

      TN Department of Agriculture Inspected and Certified
      for over 15 years!





      “People don't care how much you know until they know how much you care”
      ― Zig Ziglar

    9. #89
      matherfish's Avatar
      matherfish is offline Senior Member
      This user has no status.
       
      Feeling:
      ----
       
      Join Date
      Jun 2006
      Location
      Nashville, TN
      Posts
      12,238
      My thoughts today as I worked in the greenhouse were concerning the plants for the aquariums. I have tropical fish in the kiddie ponds during the summer to eat mosquito larvae, and move them into aquariums during the winter so that they can be heated. It is also a good place to put some plants, especially lilies, to hopefully get some growth during the winter. The fish I have are mollies, platys, guppies and swordtails. This year I have added dwarf gouramis.

      In a trade with Lil-_Mikey, I received some minuta seeds and some amazonum seeds. I planted the seeds about two months ago, and they sprouted great! Both of these varieties must be extremely slow growers, because I still do not have a plant with a floating pad. There are over 100 minuta plants, and about 30 amazonum, and none have a floating pad! Because of this, they need to continue growing through the winter.

      The dwarf gourami need to be able to get gulps of air from above the surface of the water, so the aquariums with them in it cannot have the water's surface covered with lily pads, but the fish are bubble nest builders and need floating leaves on the water's surface to build their bubble nest under. This seems like a great combination for aquarium buddies, the minuta and the dwarf gouramis. The minuta do not get big so their pads are not huge, but the pots also give the gouramis places to hide behind. The floating pads (when I get them ) will be a good place for the fish to build their nests. I hope I am right in doing this.

      Isn't it amazing that I have to plot all of these things out, but in nature they are already worked out? As ponders we have to reproduce what nature does naturally. The satisfaction is worth all of the effort.

      Keep on "pond"ering!
      Sunfire Hardy Water Lily now available
      [/B]
      See my Pro Seller store on Koiphen[B]

      TN Department of Agriculture Inspected and Certified
      for over 15 years!





      “People don't care how much you know until they know how much you care”
      ― Zig Ziglar

    10. #90
      matherfish's Avatar
      matherfish is offline Senior Member
      This user has no status.
       
      Feeling:
      ----
       
      Join Date
      Jun 2006
      Location
      Nashville, TN
      Posts
      12,238
      I am on Facebook, and noticed recently a thread about how many more days it is until Thanksgiving and how many more days until Christmas. For some reason, I started thinking about that today. For some, Christmas is coming too soon, and for others, it is not soon enough. For me, I started thinking that frosts are only about a month away, but that March is only 4 months away.

      I will have to start harvesting tropical lily tubers in a few weeks to get them in before a hard frost. It is a lot of work, but it is also enjoyable. It is like going through clams or oysters looking for a pearl. Going through the pots I still get excited finding tubers among the roots, and I get really excited when I find numerous tubers, especially if it is a "special" lily. Not many clams produce pearls, but most tropical lilies will have produced a tuber, so the search is rewarding!

      But my pondering continued to the fact that March is not far away. I do not look forward to winter, and am happy when it is gone. I know, some people like it, but I am not one of them. I love the look of snow on the ground, icicles on the waterfalls, etc., but do not like the cold. Did I mention I do not like the freezing cold?

      But late February, and March is the time when things start waking up. Daffodils and Tulips start showing their heads through the snow or ground. It is also when I start dividing lotuses and, as I had in October/November, get the joy of discovering the tubers in the lotus tubs. Just as the lily tubers had represented the promise of lilies for the next year, the lotus tubers offer the promise of those gorgeous lotus blooms throughout the summer.

      So, no matter how you look at it, it will not be long before the ritual starts all over again, and once again, we get to POND!

      Until then, keep "pond"ering!
      Sunfire Hardy Water Lily now available
      [/B]
      See my Pro Seller store on Koiphen[B]

      TN Department of Agriculture Inspected and Certified
      for over 15 years!





      “People don't care how much you know until they know how much you care”
      ― Zig Ziglar

    11. #91
      matherfish's Avatar
      matherfish is offline Senior Member
      This user has no status.
       
      Feeling:
      ----
       
      Join Date
      Jun 2006
      Location
      Nashville, TN
      Posts
      12,238
      My thinking today led me to remind myself to thank you for reading this thread, so I want to say " thank you." I have enjoyed writing it.

      Also "pond"ering today, I decided that I should explain something. I know there is no actual word "ponding" in the dictionary, but I think there should be. I would define it as "the act of owning, or caring for, or tending to a pond." A "ponder" is one "who owns, cares for, or tends to a pond." And "pondering," which is a legitimate word, currently means considering or "mulling over" something, should have an additional meaning, "thinking, considering or meditating on ponds." Since I am not the editor of a dictionary, nor do I work for a place that produces dictionaries, I have no ability to add these to the list of "new" words which are added each year. That doesn't mean they will never be added, it just means I can't be the one to add them. However, I will continue to use them even if they are not added.

      This is true of the word "pic" also. If it has been added to the list of legitimate words, I am not aware of it. It is an abbreviation of the word picture, but I like to use the word as a word, not as an abbreviation. This thought also reminds me of something I have heard in the past. Why is the action of reducing a long word to a shortened form called an abbreviation, a long word in itself?

      My thoughts, as I was meandering through my mind , also brought me to the thoughts again as to how much joy our ponds bring us. We do not need PhDs in science, biology, botany, chemistry or even degrees in aquatics, genetics, medicine (fish do get sick, you know ), insects, regulations and whatever else I have missed. Despite this, we all have learned some of each of these things in knowing how to deal with the success of our ponds. I have mentioned that we can share our knowledge with others, but have you stopped to "ponder" how much you know that you can share with others who might be casually or seriously asking questions about ponding? From pond construction, to water purification and flow, to water testing to cleaning and maintenance, to repair and finally to caring for its inhabitants, both aquatic and flora, we have experienced and studied and gained information.

      So, with your ego swelling, enjoy your "pond"ering!
      Last edited by matherfish; 1 Week Ago at 12:26 AM.
      Sunfire Hardy Water Lily now available
      [/B]
      See my Pro Seller store on Koiphen[B]

      TN Department of Agriculture Inspected and Certified
      for over 15 years!





      “People don't care how much you know until they know how much you care”
      ― Zig Ziglar

    12. #92
      Koigrl's Avatar
      Koigrl is offline Senior Member
      is So many fishes, so little
      time... ;)
       
      Feeling:
      Awesome
       
      Join Date
      Jul 2008
      Location
      Zone 6, NY, USA
      Posts
      5,017

      Pondering is not just for humans...

      Wut? What just happened?

      She's fine now.
      Attached Images Attached Images    



      Ki Shusui Project : 300k Challenge : 500k Build : Flock Spawn Jamboree : Our Ki Midori Champions




      Ten minute video of Russ Peters sexing our future ki shusui oyagoi. : http://youtu.be/AhROs1cjC18

      Updated for the 2017 Harvest: What is "ki shusui?" Short version http://www.kishusui.com

      Twelve seconds that are the entire point of the last seven years!
      https://youtu.be/zNqTJgM3lpY

      If you're reading this, you're on Team Ki.
      Kichi loves company. Max


      K-POTY 2013

    13. #93
      matherfish's Avatar
      matherfish is offline Senior Member
      This user has no status.
       
      Feeling:
      ----
       
      Join Date
      Jun 2006
      Location
      Nashville, TN
      Posts
      12,238
      Nice looking frog koigrl. Was that the only one in the pond? Thanks for sharing!
      Today's pondering pertains to over wintering plants. On various threads here on KP there have been lots of good ideas as to keeping our plants alive over the winter. I was thinking that maybe a post with the ideas in one place might be helpful, so, I thought, why not try?

      One of the suggestions for tubs or smaller containers that are above the ground is to cover the top with clear plastic, the thicker the better. This gives the greenhouse effect. Keeping the plastic held on is easier with bungee cords, but you could also tie a rope or cord around the tub to hold it on, but it is hard to get it as tight as a bungee cord would. the plastic allows the heat to be built up in the tub and helps retain it. Packing bags of mulch or sand or soil around the outside of the tub would also help helps insulate the tub to keep the cold from getting into the pot as easy, and helps keep the heat in.

      For bigger ponds you might want to consider building frames that could be covered with plastic sheeting to make "cold frames" covering your pond. The frames can be made of pvc pipe because of its flexibility, and available fittings, but remember that you need to construct the frame so that it will not break in snowstorms or strong winds. A few pipes might hold the plastic up, but may not hold in bad weather. If available, wood poles or bamboo poles can also be used instead of pvc.

      You will want all "frames" to have enough "pitch" so that snow or rain runs off and does not "puddle" up or build up and crush your structure into your pond.

      To build the frame, you might consider doing some of these things:

      If your pond is an in-ground one, figure how you will do your "ribs" and how many you will need. Then, mark on the ground where your ribs will stand. Then dig small holes just a little bigger than the size of the pipe you are going to use. Put a piece of pipe big enough to fit the "rib" into, into the ground, and cut off even with the ground. It needs to be 8" deep or deeper. This way you can drop your "rib" pipe into the ground pipe to hold it in the ground. Use fittings to keep it tight. Bend your rib pipe if possible, so that it reaches the other side, putting two pipes together with coupler if needed. This keeps any sharp points from being at the top. Tie or tape all of your pipes together at the top. Depending on the size of the pond, you may need to put supports horizontally as well. This can be done by cutting the ribs and using couples, put short pieces of pipe between the ribs. this helps to 'stiffen" up the frame. The larger the diameter the pipe, the sturdier it is, but instead of "bending" the pipe you may have to use couplers to form it, such as 45* angle couplers.

      If you pond is in a wooden frame above ground, you can simple attach the pieces of pvc to the outside of your pond using duct strapping, and place the rib ends into the holders, or get the formed metal pipe holders and put them on the outsides, and do the same thing for the frame mentioned in the previous paragraph.

      Lastly, if you have a plastic pond above ground, you may want to glue the holders onto the outside of your pond., or build frame and put in place by doing the same thing as suggested for in ground ponds. Whether wooden or plastic, it would help to also put bags of mulch, sand or soil all around the outside bottom of the pond.

      All of these suggestions are made with the idea that they can be repeated year after year using the same rib holders and ribs. Save you frame pieces to be re-used also. Remember also, the thicker the plastic, the better it holds up. Use nails, tape or bungee cords etc., to attach the plastic cover.

      Maybe I have given you some ideas to think about, or to ponder over! I hope I have not confused you.
      Keep on "pond"ering!
      Sunfire Hardy Water Lily now available
      [/B]
      See my Pro Seller store on Koiphen[B]

      TN Department of Agriculture Inspected and Certified
      for over 15 years!





      “People don't care how much you know until they know how much you care”
      ― Zig Ziglar

    14. #94
      matherfish's Avatar
      matherfish is offline Senior Member
      This user has no status.
       
      Feeling:
      ----
       
      Join Date
      Jun 2006
      Location
      Nashville, TN
      Posts
      12,238
      Okay, so I didn't work in the greenhouse today, but even though it is late, I still need to get out there. I was busy today and did not put fuel in the heater to help keep the greenhouse somewhat warm so the aquarium heaters would not have to work so hard. it will not get down cold enough to hurt the plants, but the tropical fish in the aquariums do not want to get cold.

      So what is the pondering all about today? Sundays are busy for me with church and church related activities, so there has not been a lot of time to ponder the pond. But I did have a few thoughts.

      I mainly thought about the large number of tubers that I have and that if I had reduced my inventory more, I would have less work. you are correct if you are thinking that is a "no-brainer." The problem is, it is a little late now. I will need to store everything for the winter and hope to do a better job next year.

      Talking with a friend today who raises cattle, I was told that they cut hay three times a year to get at least 500 large round bales of hay to feed their cattle during the winter. I started thinking of just how much room you would have to have to store that much hay. I know it is not the same, but it did make me appreciate the fact that it does not take a lot of room to store tubers. It is all in perspective, I know, and I am not comparing the two things, except for this one fact. It is easier to store tubers than hay, and in a lot smaller space.

      Have fun with your pond, and enjoy the hobby! Keep on "pond"ering! I am off to fill the heater.
      Sunfire Hardy Water Lily now available
      [/B]
      See my Pro Seller store on Koiphen[B]

      TN Department of Agriculture Inspected and Certified
      for over 15 years!





      “People don't care how much you know until they know how much you care”
      ― Zig Ziglar

    15. #95
      matherfish's Avatar
      matherfish is offline Senior Member
      This user has no status.
       
      Feeling:
      ----
       
      Join Date
      Jun 2006
      Location
      Nashville, TN
      Posts
      12,238
      Today's "pond"ering concerns the storing of tropical marginal plants. I have several different kinds of marginal or bog plants that I need to store over the winter each year. I have these plants potted up and in shallow ponds throughout the growing season. Plants, such as taro, canna, and thalia, get large but cannot be left outside in the cold. I have continued to leave them in the ponds in their pots throughout the winter, but I have been thinking about ways to condense their need for space.
      My first thoughts are that I could maybe cut the "plant" off and store just the 'tuber," much like I do the tropical lily tubers. I know that retail stores sell elephant ears in boxes that contain the tuber or bulb. I am not sure how that would work on water taro.
      I know that there is a large difference between the different types of marginals. They do not have the same characteristics, nor the same structure and needs. Plants such as dwarf papyrus and dwarf umbrella are very different from taro and cannas. I believe that if I cut the greenery off, the root mass would put up new leaves next year, but have not done that in the past and do not know if it would kill the plant.
      Some of you may have done some things to store your plants and think that it is common knowledge. I have not researched books and the internet to find suggestions, so I am thinking that I need to do that.
      What do you do with your plants during the winter? Share with us what has worked and what has not worked if you will.
      In the meantime, keep "pond"ering!
      Sunfire Hardy Water Lily now available
      [/B]
      See my Pro Seller store on Koiphen[B]

      TN Department of Agriculture Inspected and Certified
      for over 15 years!





      “People don't care how much you know until they know how much you care”
      ― Zig Ziglar

    16. #96
      matherfish's Avatar
      matherfish is offline Senior Member
      This user has no status.
       
      Feeling:
      ----
       
      Join Date
      Jun 2006
      Location
      Nashville, TN
      Posts
      12,238
      Do you think it is time for me to stop posting on this thread? I know that many are closing up their ponds for the winter, so the interest is down, although I still see many readers of the posts. It is getting cooler quick here, so there is lots to do before winter, but not a lot of exciting things to write about.
      There are still a few lily blooms, but they will soon be gone as we will be harvesting tubers. The seedlings in the aquariums are interesting, but they are not growing quick enough to garner any excitement very often. So far I have readied over 300 bags of tubers that were not planted out this year by taking the tubers and cleaning them and putting them in fresh sand. Still have almost that many left to do before pulling tubers that are in pots. I am a lily obsessed, I know!
      I acquired several new varieties of ISG lilies this summer, and am excited about seeing them mature and bloom next year! Blooms are always exciting each year, but new acquisitions are always a bonus. I think everyone feels that way.
      So, on a slow day, happy "pond"ering!
      Last edited by matherfish; 9 Hours Ago at 10:47 PM.
      Sunfire Hardy Water Lily now available
      [/B]
      See my Pro Seller store on Koiphen[B]

      TN Department of Agriculture Inspected and Certified
      for over 15 years!





      “People don't care how much you know until they know how much you care”
      ― Zig Ziglar

    Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst ... 2345

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •