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Thread: Have you ever "put down" a fish,

  1. #1
    Muddywaters is offline
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    Have you ever "put down" a fish,

    Or just let nature take it's course? I have a Shubunkin that is at least 12 years old. Has been struggling, laying flat on the bottom, very stoic. Wakes up a bit when I net it, but then just struggles back to the bottom.
    Last edited by Muddywaters; 1 Week Ago at 04:29 PM.

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    Yes, I have, several times over many years. Put it in a container with a couple gallons of water, add some clove oil, mix REALLY WELL and add the fish. Once asleep, remove and place in freezer. It won't feel a thing. As for you, well, that may be a different story, sorry.
    Mike

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    Yes, unfortunately. Put 30 drops of clove oil to a gallon of water and cover him for an hour. He'll just go to sleep and not wake up.

    Sorry, we all know how hard it is but it's better than letting him suffer.
    Sandy
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    Sorry about your Shubunkin,
    I had to euthanize a 2' koi last year and used an over dose of clove oil and left it in the water for a couple hours (probably longer than needed).
    It was very hard for me to do but knowing she was no longer suffering made it the right thing to do.
    Happiness is adopting a mutt and my pond is FULL of Happiness....
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    ricshaw's Avatar
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    When I had to euthanize a 2' Koi, I over dosed it with clove oil in the water until it stop breathing. Then I shot it in the brain with my pellet gun.
    I did not have room in my freezer, so I wrapped it up good in newspaper and put in the trash. The Koi was suffering and it was the right thing to do.

  6. #6
    KoiValley's Avatar
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    Koi will live for more than two hours after a strong dose of clove oil or MS-222. It is amazing. I have seen this happen on several occasions with very similar results contrary to the thought put forth by the "experts".

    I had the opportunity to participate with a veterinary lab to do an analysis of the internal organs long after we expected the fish to be alive. We were all stunned by the fact that the heart was still beating nearly three hours after the supposed last rights with clove oil. I also have reason to believe that the results would be quite similar when using MS-222, mainly from my experiences with another trial in South Florida.

    So, if your "best friend" is a little late in the recovery mode it would be best to continue the recovery procedures well into the third hour..

    I have seen owners of koi at a national koi show literally sitting inside a tank working the gills and helping the koi to recover. Sometimes not so successfully, but I certainly gave them credit for their perserverence......

    Karl
    Last edited by KoiValley; 1 Week Ago at 05:59 PM.
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  7. #7
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    This is part of the hobby I'm not looking forward to. Must say though, I'm glad there are posts so I can become as educated as possible so when the time comes, and I'm sure it will, I will be better prepared.
    Thanks
    V.

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    kevin32 is offline
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    edit. I just saw koi Valley post. I had a fish that was out of water for over 3 hours or more so the internal organs do seem to live through it. the fish did suffer bacterial infection but did heal and i rehomed it.

    does freezing them Keep them from feeling anything? and what else can you do ?
    Last edited by kevin32; 1 Week Ago at 12:32 AM.

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    We all see those videos of Koi breeders culling newly born koi, and then the process is repeated several times until maybe several thousand fry become a hundred or so 'keepers'. Do those little koi feel the same as a 20" koi when they are chucked in the bin? I guess so. We just seem to get sentimentally attached to the 20 incher. Maybe because of it's size we think it will 'feel' more pain than the little culled fry? I have a couple of koi that are really just 'taking up valuable space'. Humane killing or just knock 'em on the head?

    Dan

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    kevin32 is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by danbo View Post
    We all see those videos of Koi breeders culling newly born koi, and then the process is repeated several times until maybe several thousand fry become a hundred or so 'keepers'. Do those little koi feel the same as a 20" koi when they are chucked in the bin? I guess so. We just seem to get sentimentally attached to the 20 incher. Maybe because of it's size we think it will 'feel' more pain than the little culled fry? I have a couple of koi that are really just 'taking up valuable space'. Humane killing or just knock 'em on the head?

    Dan
    rehome them

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by danbo View Post
    We all see those videos of Koi breeders culling newly born koi, and then the process is repeated several times until maybe several thousand fry become a hundred or so 'keepers'. Do those little koi feel the same as a 20" koi when they are chucked in the bin? I guess so. We just seem to get sentimentally attached to the 20 incher. Maybe because of it's size we think it will 'feel' more pain than the little culled fry? I have a couple of koi that are really just 'taking up valuable space'. Humane killing or just knock 'em on the head?

    Dan
    The culling process is done to eliminate deformities and other maladies from stock that, at a very early age, aren't worth the breeder's time to continue to raise further. Also, they don't have near enough room to handle several hundred thousand to millions of hatchlings. They've been doing this for well over 100 years so they know the percentages of sellable stock to begin with. This is a far cry from the occasionally ill fish that needs/should be put down due to not being healthy enough to recover from whatever ails them regardless of size. Most don't just put down a fish because it didn't turn out the way they expected. And whether fish feel things the way humans do, I really doubt it and it's a bit difficult to answer as we get no response from the fish itself!lol

    Yes, just re-home the individual.
    Mike

    check out our website at: http://www.pond-life.net



    "Our goal is to assist with emergency and Koi health issues, as well as educate on best practices. Please help us gain a clear picture by giving the original poster time to answer our questions before offering opinions and suggested treatments."

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