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  • Results 1 to 5 of 5

    Thread: Plumbing pond to handle winter???

    1. #1
      Patrickcrocetta is offline Junior Member
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      Plumbing pond to handle winter???

      I'm in CT and we freeze come winter. I am installing a pressurized filter system with external pump. My skimmer and BD piping will run underground about 20" below ground and surface just before the pump. Pump and bead filter are outside.

      So everyone tells me I need to shut down the skimmer, lower the water level below the skimmer and drain the skimmer line. Only use the BD and circulate the water through the filter and back out to the pond through Jets/TPR. It makes sense so this is what I will do. Agree?

      Question: Check valves--If my pond is 4' deep and my piping is 20" below ground why would I need a check valve for either the skimmer or BD? Gravity will/should feed the pump--certainly for the BD but I would think also for the skimmer---right??? I ask this because if I can't get all the water out of the skimmer line a check valve would prevent water from expanding in the pipe potentially--right? Can't I skimp using check valves in my situation? If NO, then where should I install the BD and Skimmer check valves? Can I just burry the valves in the ground or should I make them accessible from above ground like in a service pit?

      Question 2: How would you drain the skimmer line? With air? So I need to prep the pipe with a fitting that accommodates a compressor? If yes, should I install this on the pipe just as it comes out of the ground and connects into the pump?

      Question 3: I plan to cover the pond with a solar cover. Should I do same for pump and filter?

      Thanks in advance for helping me with your advice.

    2. #2
      RichToyBox's Avatar
      RichToyBox is offline Administrator ~ WWKC BOD ~
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      If you are planning to cover with solar cover, make the cover a lean-to, to allow some air space between the pond and cover. Make it accessible, so that you can get under the cover to maintain the skimmer and check on the fish. If the filter and pump are close enough to the pond, make the cover extend over them.

      If covered as described above, I would not take the skimmer off line. I would not drain the pond to below the skimmer level.

      If the pump and plumbing are not under the cover, the biggest fear is a power outage during extreme cold spells. The fact that water is not running through those areas that are exposed, you can have freeze damage to those components.

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    3. #3
      Patrickcrocetta is offline Junior Member
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      Richtoy--
      Thanks for helping me! What about buying a generator? No one seems to be bringing this up??? Seems the easiest way to ensure the pump/filter continues to work no matter what? Also, any suggestion on where to install the check valves--are they needed in my application, if so--underground or above?

    4. #4
      Patrickcrocetta is offline Junior Member
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      Richtoy, so what if I just do a generator? This would ensure pump/filter never lose power? Also, do you know anythng about check valves? Do I need them and if so, where?

    5. #5
      RichToyBox's Avatar
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      I am in an area that experiences power outages from ice, hurricanes, tropical storms, and sometimes for no apparent reason. If it is a major storm event, my power is out for 6 days usually. I got a small gasoline powered generator and used it. Had a hurricane come about 10 years ago and that generator was having starter clutch problems, so I got another and when the storm passed, got that one fixed. I was able to keep the ponds running and alternate the refrigerator, freezer, and occasionally sneak in the coffee maker, with the first generator. With the second, I was able to run both of those, the microwave, coffee maker, TV and computers. The problem with those generators is that someone has to be home to start them. Because many outages last only a few minutes, I would generally wait for up to 2 hours to fire them up. Got tired of that and installed a standby generator that takes care of most of the house and the ponds with the covered circuits being off no more than about 30 seconds. I do not have the pond heaters on the generator, but even 6 days due to ice, I don't think I would lose more than about 5 or 6 degrees.

      If it is really brutal cold, I don't know how long you would have to get the generator going before the pump and exposed piping would start to freeze. I expect it would probably be an hour or so before damage.

      Generators are one of the pieces of equipment that I personally think that every pond owner should have in case of emergency. All generators need to have proper maintenance done, and need to be exercised regularly to assure that they will fire when needed.

      As for the check valves, I generally stay out of the plumbing threads. We have some that are much more versed in it than I am.

      "Our goal is to assist with emergency and Koi health issues, as well as educate on best practices. Please help us gain a clear picture by giving the original poster time to answer our questions before offering opinions and suggested treatments."

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