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    Thread: The NEW Zakki Sieve Filters and a breif explanation of Wedge Wire Sieve Filters

    1. #1
      Zac Penn's Avatar
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      Thumbs up The NEW Zakki Sieve Filters and a breif explanation of Wedge Wire Sieve Filters

      In order to understand the need for the new Zakki Sieve Filters you need to fully understand what a sieve filter is, how they operate, and what their advantages and disadvantages are. Wedge wire sieve dewatering filters have been used for a very long time in many industries. All of them have had small differences that set them apart from the rest, but the main function of these filters is to remove solid waste from the water column. Each filter has something that is called a wedge wire sieve screen. This screen is made out of support rods (provide a skeleton for the screen) and wedge wires. The wedge wires are also called "V" wires by some, but they are the same thing. The top flat surface of the V is where the solids are separated from the liquid and each wedge wire has a small space before the next wire. This space is called the slot opening and it dictates the serration point between the water and waste. Using a 500 micron slot opening, means that particles larger than 500 microns in size will be separated from the water and remain trapped on the screen. If the screen was oriented inside the filter so that it was horizontal, the debris would pile up on top of the screen and start to clog all of the slot openings. This would then reduce the amount of open area for the water to pass through, and you would then start to have standing water on top of the screen. This is not ideal because it would start to dissolve the debris that was being separated, and the screen would require a lot of maintenance. This is why wedge wire sieve filters have a slope to the screen. By placing the screen at an angle, the water will pass straight through the screen, but the debris being separated will be pushed down the slope, and remain out of the water column. This way the contact area of the screen remains open and water doesn’t build up above the screen. The slope of the screen not only helps to push the debris down to the bottom of the screen, but it also effectively reduces the slot opening of the wedge wire screen. This picture illustrates my point…
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      The aperture size (slot opening) is a distance between the two wedge wires. Depending on what slope the screen is angled to, the effective opening (sized particle remove by the screen) will change. In the example above the screen is sloped at a 60 degree angle. Using some trigonometry we can determine the effective opening size. Using this picture you can see the given angles and distances that are created with a 60 degree slope…
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      Since we know what the slope of the screen is (60 degrees), and we know the slot opening size (500 microns) we can determine what the effective opening size is (?) by the following formula…Cos(60) = ? / 500 which is the same as .5 = ? / 500 which means that 250 microns = ?
      So the effective opening size is actually 250 microns due to the aggressive slope of the screen. This effective opening size is only valid if the screen has a flat surface, and the slope is constant. Many of the sieve screens are bent to a specified radius, so at the top of the screen the slope is very steep and only a minimal slope is at the bottom of the screen. This means that the smaller particles would be separated at the top of the screen, but when the debris got pushed to the bottom of the screen the small particles would fall through the slot opening. Now if the surface of the screen was flat and had a constant slope, the effective opening would remain constant all the way down the screen. However that is not a guarantee that the particles smaller than the slot opening will remain on the screen. There is still a good chance that the debris will fall through the slop openings at least 50% of the time. This is why the effective opening is not talked about very often, because it doesn’t guarantee a separation size. Most sieves used in the koi pond hobby are sloped at 35 degrees to 55 degrees. It varies by the manufacturer, and the slope also affects the length of the screen. A steeper screen will require more length for the water to completely pass through, while a minimal slope will allow the water to pass through a smaller length of screen. Deepwater Koi Innovations prefers a slope of around 50 degrees and all of our screens are flat to maximize the effective opening. This combination gains us a small effective opening, while reducing the need for an extra long screen. All of our sieve screens have a slot opening of 250 microns and an effective opening of 161 microns. Remember this does not guarantee a separation of all 161 micron particles, but it does remove a lot of them.

      Now that you know a little about the screen itself, you need to know how the water gets supplied to the screen. There are two main ways of accomplishing this task.

      Pump Fed Sieve Filters…
      The first way of supplying water to a sieve screen is by having a water pump suck directly from the pond, and pump the dirty water into the sieve filter. This is by far the cheapest and least complicated method of water delivery, but it is also the least effective method. The large debris will end up getting trapped inside the pumps leaf basket where it will quickly decompose and add unnecessary nutrients into the water column. The medium sized particles will get chopped up by the impeller inside the water pump. This will send more small particles to the sieve screen. These extra, small particles would have been contained inside the medium piece of debris that would have been separated from the water column by the screen, but now there is a good chance it could pass through the slot openings and on to the rest of the filtration. One benefit of the pump fed sieve filters is that it can be installed above pond water level. This is nice for retro-fitting ponds with new filtration or in areas, where it is too difficult to dig out a filtration pit. This style of sieve filter also allows the pond to have small suction lines such as swimming pool bottom drains and skimmers. This form of water delivery is not completely dependent on a specific water level inside the pond. If the pump is sucking from a skimmer then as long as the water is above the skimmer door, the pump will work. If the sieve is attached to a bottom drains then as long as there is water in the pond, the sieve will continue to function. This allows the hobbyist to perform large water changes without having to shut down their filtration systems.

      Gravity Fed Sieve Filters…
      This method of water delivery is a little more complicated, and requires the use of moving parts. The top of the filter is usually installed 1” above maximum pond water level, and the remainder of the filter is below water level. The water pump is placed after the sieve, so the pumps impellers only receive filtered water which reduces the maintenance for the pond owner. This method also allows for large debris to enter the filter intact so the extra small particles remain trapped inside the larger debris. The moving parts I mentioned earlier are attached to a float system that moves up and down based on how much water is being sucked out of the filter. Some manufacturers use a moving tray which requires flexible bellows that can warp and twist which will reduce the total flow. Other manufacturers use a stationary tray and have an adjustable weir that travels up and down. The adjustable weir is the better of the two designs, because it allows for more adjustment, and there is nothing inside the filter that can reduce the total water flow. One major downfall to these gravity fed sieve filters is their complete dependence on a constant water level inside the pond. The internal float systems have a limited amount of travel, so if the pond water level begins to drop, then water pump will begin to suck air. This requires that filtration systems water flow be slowed way down so as not to damage the water pumps. If a large water change is needed, then the filtration system may need to be shut down completely until the regular water level is regained. This can have an impact on the biological filtration that follows these gravity fed sieve filters. It doesn't seem like a big deal, but it can get frustrating at times always having to reduce the water flow during water changes.

      Up until now those were the only two methods available for delivering water to the wedge wire sieve screens. Each method had its positives and negatives, and you needed to determine which were more important to you.

      Here at Deepwater Koi Innovations, we were not happy with those two choices and set out to design a sieve filter that combined the advantages of each delivery method, and eliminate the negative attributes. It took a lot of research and testing but we feel we have created the ultimate in pre-pump wedge wire sieve filtration.
      Introducing the NEW Zakki Sieve Filter!
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      These sieve filters can be used above water level, or at water level, and with large or small suction lines. The pond water level is no longer an issue so massive water changes can be performed without worry. The water pump is always after the sieve filter, so only clean water is going through the pumps impeller. The water pump never has to be shut down when performing any filter maintenance. That means you can remove the wedge wire screen, clean it off and replace it without dealing with unplugging the water pump, nor with rushing water inside the filter. These filters operate under a vacuum which allows it to be used in so many different applications.
      The Zakki Sieve Filter is a complete all-in-one mechanical filter. There is a 250 micron wedge wire sieve screen in the top section of the filter which removes the large debris. Anything small enough to make it past the wedge wire sieve will travel through a static media bed similar to what you would find in a bead filter. The media is negatively buoyant so it sinks to the bottom and traps the fine particles as they travel through the media bed. The Zakki Sieve will perform all of the mechanical filtration before your water pump. This reduces the total footprint of the filtration area as well as costs associated with other equipment. The static media is easily backwashed and only requires the use of a standard koi pond air pump to agitate the media and release the trapped debris. This cleaning cycle only takes 90 seconds to complete, and you never have to turn off your water pump. The Zakki Sieve was designed so that the water pump remains on all the time, even during maintenance. This means you never have to worry about loosing the prime on the pump.

      There are four different filtration modes that the Zakki Sieve can be placed into. Please pay attention to the changes in the valves with the different modes. Follow the red arrows to understand how the water flows through the filtration system.

      Normal Filter Mode...
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      The water comes from the pond and enters the Zakki Sieve through the top inlet. The large debris is filtered out by the sieve screen and the waste is collected in the lower collection trough, where it waits for you to flush it away. The smaller particles and clean water pass down through the screen and into the static media bed. The sinking media filters out the small debris and only clean water exits the filter via the lower outlet. The pump sucks the water out of the sieve filter, and pumps it out to your biological filter.

      Bypass Filtration Mode...
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      In order to perform maintenance on the filter you need to place the filter into bypass mode which releases the vacuum being held in the filter. To do this you simply rotate the bottom suction 3-way valve 90 degrees so the "OFF" label on the valve is pointing toward the filter. This allows the water pump to suck directly from the pond and bypass the filter. The top 2-way valve on the inlet side of the filter needs to be closed as well to completely isolate the filter from the suction side of the water pump. Once these two valves are closed you can open up the filter and perform any kind of maintenance you need and never turn off the water pump. To place the filter back into Normal Filter Mode you first need to make sure all ball valves on the filter body are closed and make sure the lid is securely latched. Then open the top 2-way valve, on the inlet side of the filter, and rotate the suction 3-way valve 90 degrees so the "OFF" label is facing the bypass plumbing line.

      Sieve Screen Cleaning Mode...
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      The waste being removed from the water via the wedge wire sieve needs to be flushed out of the filter as often as you can. This is to eliminate the chance of debris dissolving back into the water column. Most debris that is captured by the sieve will be soft and very easily dissolved. The longer this material remains in the filter the more it gets dissolved. To flush out the waste you simply place the filter into Bypass Filter Mode, then open the waste trough ball valve (not pictured but on the backside of the filter), then slowly rotate the top pressurized 3-way valve (on the vertical return plumbing) to allow clean water to spill over the wedge wire screen, and flush the debris out of the waste trough. It only take a few seconds and a couple gallons of water to preform this action. Once the screen is clean just return the filter to Bypass Mode, verify all the ball valves are closed, and return filter to Normal Operation.

      Static Media Cleaning Mode...
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      This operation needs to be performed at least once a week for optimum results. The more frequent you backwash the static media the better the water quality will be. The trapped debris in the media bed will be slowly dissolving organics into the water column that will lead to increased surface bubbles in the pond and water discoloration. A backwash once a week is a minimum requirement, and should be performed twice a week for optimum results. However if you are going on vacation, the filter can be left alone for as long as needed, but know that your water quality will suffer. To clean the static media you simply place the filter into Bypass Mode, open the lower backwash valve (not pictured but on the backside of the filter) then direct air into the bottom 1/2" air valve at the base of the filter. This will begin to agitate the media and place the trapped particles into suspension throughout the water. After 45-60 seconds of agitation, slowly begin to rotate the lower pressurized 3-way valve (on the vertical return plumbing) which will direct clean water into the bottom of the filter. This will push the dirty water up and out the backwash valve. For the first 45-60 seconds keep the media agitated with the incoming air, then for the remaining 30-45 seconds turn off the air supply and only backwash with water. This will allow all of the debris in suspension above the media bed to travel up and out of the filter. Once the water and media is clean, the 3-way valve will be rotated back into the normal position, and the backwash valve will be closed. Then verify that all other ball valves are closed and that the lid is securely fastened, then filter can be placed back into Normal Operation.

      For those of you that already have bead filters installed on your ponds, but are looking for the ultimate in pre-pump filtration the Zakki Sieve has a little brother...
      The Zakki Sieve Junior
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      The Zakki Sieve Jr operates under the same conditions, works the same way, but it is lacking the static media bed in the lower section of the filter. This filter should only be used, if you already have existing mechanical filtration that will come after the sieve. By removing the static media bed, you are able to reduce the total size of the filter, and eliminate some of the plumbing components. This filter only has three filtration modes...
      Normal Filtration Mode, Bypass Filtration Mode, and Sieve Screen Cleaning Mode
      This is a filter that can be neglected for a long time without maintenance, but it is not recommended that you do this on a regular basis. As with the original Zakki Sieve, the longer the debris is trapped on the sieve screen, the more excessive nutrients will be dissolved into the water column. The operation of the filter will be the same whether it is cleaned everyday or left alone for two weeks, only the water quality will be affected.
      Here is the Zakki Sieve Jr after two weeks of neglect...
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      That is over 6" thick of waste collected in the waste trough.

      Pricing for the Zakki Sieve Filters...
      Currently there are two sizes available for the original Zakki Sieve.
      24" Diameter filter with a max flow of 5500 gph....$1395 + freight
      16"
      Diameter filter with a max flow of 2500 gph....$850 + freight

      At this time there is only one size available for the Zakki Sieve Jr.
      16" Diameter with a max flow of 4500 gph....$950 + freight
      Anything more than 4500 gph and it gets a little too splashy inside the waste trough. That doesn't mean it will not "work" at a higher flow rate.

      Pricing includes all valves required for a standard setup. A water pump with a leaf basket is required for the Zakki Sieves.

      Zac Penn.... Not an expert on Pump Testing, no matter what people may think!
      904-288-6199
      Zac@DeepwaterKoi.com
      www.DeepwaterKoi.com


    2. #2
      Zac Penn's Avatar
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      Here are some random questions that have been directed toward me, and I figured they would be useful to all...

      1) Are the lid hold-down clips made of stainless steel and how do they stand up to the weather?
      Yes they are 316 SS made in USA, and are very durable. I have has prototype clamps in use at a customers house on the beach for over a year and not a slight sign of rust.
      2) What kind of warranty do you provide?
      1 yr just like all other manufacturers
      3) Why is the 16" deluxe model less than the Zakki Junior?
      The reason for the lower costs is the size of the screen. The junior has twice the screen size, to handle a higher waste load for a longer period of time. Throughout development I have tested many different designs for the wedge wire screen, and had one specially designed to suit my desires. This screen is much more expensive than the screens used in the other sieves, and it can handle a much higher flow rate per sq in of screen surface.
      4) Why does the 16" Zakki Junior have a higher maximum flow rate than the 16" deluxe model?
      This has to do with the static media bed. Too high of a flow rate and the debris will not be trapped.
      5) How many of these have been up and running and for how long?
      There are 8 Zakki Sieves over 6 months sold, and one Jr that has been on a local pond for 2 months.
      6) How is the bottom attached to the side housing? Glued or hot welded?
      It is hot air welded inside and out. This is a very strong connection.
      7) Any issues with leaks developing at the nozzle connections or bottom?
      No
      8) Is the entire vessel completely flooded during normal operation or is there an air dome required to ensure that the collected debris moves down the v-screen into the collection through?
      No, the water level is maintained below the sieve screen, so that the waste is kept out of the water column.
      9) If a certain level has to be maintained, how do you ensure that the air isn't eventually sucked out of the container?
      The water level stays where it is due to the design of the filter. No worries of it filling up with water, unless the top is installed lower than 1" above water level.
      10) Is the v-screen U.S. made?
      Made in USA 316 SS
      11) Do you accept Paypal?
      Yes
      12) How do you prime the unit for the first time? In my case, it will be located about 18" above pond water level. I'm planning on installing a swing check valve on the inlet pipe.
      Priming simply requires the whole container to be filled with water and for you to fill the inlet pipe as well. Once the pump is turned on, the water will begin to flow through the filter and whatever air was trapped in the inlet line (before the check valve) will get sucked into the filter. Once all the air is out of the plumbing line, you can adjust the water level one of two ways. Too much water in filter (water level above waste trough) you slightly open the air bleeder valve on the lid which will let air in and lower the water level. Too little water, then you place the filter in by-pass mode, and direct water into the filter through the cleaning 3-way valve.
      13) I've seen different types of valves for your setup, 3-way, or knife-valves. What comes with the unit?
      All systems come with 3-way valves and standard ball valves. The knife valves were only used for prototype models to save money.
      14) I estimate my flowrate at ~ 60 gpm, but what if it is significantly higher say 90 gpm. Will this not suck all the air out of the unit like on my existing priming pot?
      That is a big difference in flow, but the resulting water levels inside the filter would remain the same. The waste trough would just get splashed on more than it should due to the higher flow rate.
      15) Is the v-screen easily removable in the event I have to hose off debris?
      Yes it slides right out, and as with all sieve screens it does require periodic maintenance with a hose.
      16) Is there any way this would operate without connecting the flushing/cleaning line? Can I just take off the cover and hose the debris out through the clean-out port?
      Yes this is possible, but it would be an inconvenience for you to drag out the house each time.
      17) Is it possible to get the unit painted flat black?
      You are more than welcome to paint the unit black, but it will be shipped white.
      Zac Penn.... Not an expert on Pump Testing, no matter what people may think!
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      Zac@DeepwaterKoi.com
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    3. #3
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      Would this prefilter work with a Nexus? I have 2-4" bottom drains going to a settlement tank (it was a "lemonade out of lemons" deal so it's not perfect, it's a rectangular 5 foot deep tank, from which the Nexus draws.) I'm thinking about switching to something that will be easier to clean, and get more poo out of the water column, so a prefilter or sieve would probably be installed in this tank (I can tear out one wall to create steps down into it to do maintenance). How would you modify the two 4" BD's to work with your sieve filter?
      Vicki


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    4. #4
      Zac Penn's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by Lunatoons View Post
      Would this prefilter work with a Nexus? I have 2-4" bottom drains going to a settlement tank (it was a "lemonade out of lemons" deal so it's not perfect, it's a rectangular 5 foot deep tank, from which the Nexus draws.) I'm thinking about switching to something that will be easier to clean, and get more poo out of the water column, so a prefilter or sieve would probably be installed in this tank (I can tear out one wall to create steps down into it to do maintenance). How would you modify the two 4" BD's to work with your sieve filter?
      What is the total flow rate that you are looking to pre-filter? Currently the maximum flow through a Zakki Sieve is 5500 gph and 4500 gph through a Zakki Sieve Jr. I am working on a super sized Zakki Sieve Jr that will hopefully be able to handle 10K gph but it is still under development. If you were interested in testing one then we can work something out on that. It would have two 4" inlets installed. However if you want something tried and true, then you would require two ZS Jr's for both bottom drains. Let me know a little more about your situation and we can go from there.

      Zac
      Zac Penn.... Not an expert on Pump Testing, no matter what people may think!
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    5. #5
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      PM sent Zac


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    6. #6
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      Nice job Zac! Looks like another QUALITY product. What I really like is the ability to not have to worry about the very slight tolerance of height between a regular sieve and pond water level being so critical. The latest project we're working on has a filter pit roughly 60' away from the pond and behind a 8' high shrub screen. Try getting a level within 1/2" tolerance on that!!! The only difference at this point between using two ZS jr's and a single ultra sieve III for two BDs is the cost+shipping. Maybe on the next job!

      BTW, your shower unit is performing beautifully on the last job. Look forward to being able to order more of these from you.

      Regards

      Mike
      Mike

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    7. #7
      Zac Penn's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by koiman1950 View Post
      Nice job Zac! Looks like another QUALITY product. What I really like is the ability to not have to worry about the very slight tolerance of height between a regular sieve and pond water level being so critical. The latest project we're working on has a filter pit roughly 60' away from the pond and behind a 8' high shrub screen. Try getting a level within 1/2" tolerance on that!!! The only difference at this point between using two ZS jr's and a single ultra sieve III for two BDs is the cost+shipping. Maybe on the next job!

      BTW, your shower unit is performing beautifully on the last job. Look forward to being able to order more of these from you.

      Regards

      Mike

      Mike,
      How long before the project needs the filter? I might be able to work on the super sized Zakki Sieve Jr by then. What flow rate are you looking for?
      Zac Penn.... Not an expert on Pump Testing, no matter what people may think!
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      Bump for Zac. I sent a pm


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    9. #9
      Zac Penn's Avatar
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      Sorry I forgot to respond yesterday, but I just did

      zac
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    10. #10
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      Quote Originally Posted by Zac Penn View Post
      What is the total flow rate that you are looking to pre-filter? Currently the maximum flow through a Zakki Sieve is 5500 gph and 4500 gph through a Zakki Sieve Jr. I am working on a super sized Zakki Sieve Jr that will hopefully be able to handle 10K gph but it is still under development. If you were interested in testing one then we can work something out on that. It would have two 4" inlets installed. However if you want something tried and true, then you would require two ZS Jr's for both bottom drains. Let me know a little more about your situation and we can go from there.

      Zac
      The Nexus max flow is 4000 gph, and I think I'm running close to that.
      Vicki


      "Some of my best friends have scales!"

      Member Dallas Koi Kichi Club (www.dallaskoikichi.org)
      Member North Texas Water Garden Society (www.ntwgs.org)

      Always learning!
      6000 gallon liner pond
      Skimmer to 1/4 hp 2 speed pump to Bead filter to 4 jets,
      2-4" BD to SC to Nexus 300 to 1/4 hp Performance Pro Artesian pump to 2 S/G filters to waterfall

      Click for Dallas, Texas Forecast



    11. #11
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      I have two 4" bottom drains going into a rectangular (about 4 feet by 7 feet) settlement tank with brushes, the outlet from the SC is a 4" pipe to a Nexus 300 Eazy. Then I have a Performance Pro 1/4 hp pump, which pumps 2-2" pipes to 2 sand and gravel filters at the waterfall. I was thinking I could make the rectangular block tank into another filter pit and put a sieve in it. I don't know if that's enough room though....my understanding is that the Nexus can flow up to 4000gph, and the two S&G filters can flow 2000gph each, so I'm guessing that's what I'm getting.
      Vicki


      "Some of my best friends have scales!"

      Member Dallas Koi Kichi Club (www.dallaskoikichi.org)
      Member North Texas Water Garden Society (www.ntwgs.org)

      Always learning!
      6000 gallon liner pond
      Skimmer to 1/4 hp 2 speed pump to Bead filter to 4 jets,
      2-4" BD to SC to Nexus 300 to 1/4 hp Performance Pro Artesian pump to 2 S/G filters to waterfall

      Click for Dallas, Texas Forecast



    12. #12
      Zac Penn's Avatar
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      Can you provide me with a picture of the two 4" pipes where they enter the SC?

      You have a couple options for your setup...
      1 - Combine the two 4" BD pipes into a single 4" pipe going into a 16" Zakki Sieve Jr and keep the flow rate at 4000 gph
      2 - Purchase a 24" Zakki Sieve Jr (two 4" inlets and two 2" outlets) and run each 4" BD pipe into the ZS Jr. You could then flow up to 10,000 gph through the bottom drains.

      HOWEVER both of those options would require you to pump feed the Nexus and S&G filters.
      Option 1 would require you to either eliminate the Nexus or the S&G filters b/c you can not gravity flow from a Nexus into the S&G filters.
      Option 2 would allow you to continue using both the Nexus and S&G filters, but the nexus would have to be elevated so it can gravity flow back to the pond. You would install your existing 1/4 hp pump onto one of the ZS Jr outlets and pump into the Nexus. Then purchase another 1/4 hp pump and have it suck from the second ZS Jr outlet and pump into the S&G filters. Since you have a liner pond adding a 4" return line into the side of the pond should not be that difficult. This will make it easier to pump feed the Nexus and gravity flow that water back to the pond.

      Zac
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    13. #13
      koiman1950's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by Zac Penn View Post
      Mike,
      How long before the project needs the filter? I might be able to work on the super sized Zakki Sieve Jr by then. What flow rate are you looking for?
      Hi Zac

      Sorry for the late reply. Just saw your response. This job is getting a ultra sieve III fed by 2 BDs (4" lines). So, I take it by your response to Vicki, you now have the ZS jr in a larger size with 10,000gph capacity and 2 4" incoming lines!? Got any photos of it yet? And, the magic question, what's the price on this new unit?

      Happy New Year

      Mike
      Mike

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    14. #14
      Zac Penn's Avatar
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      Hey Mike I will have more info coming soon, but since everything isn't locked in yet, the price is not firm yet. As of now it is looking like $1600 will be the magic number on this.

      Yes this will have two 4" inlets and two 2" pump outlets. We all know it is more energy efficient to run two smaller pumps over a single large pump, and it will give you a backup pump in-case the other one gives out.

      Zac
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      weaselman is offline Senior Member
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      Zac

      How is the progress on the 24" Zakki Sieve?

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      Kujira Koi is offline Junior Member
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      What are the footprint dimensions for the Zakki Sieve Jr model, including the pipework and valves, please?

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      Do you have any of these built and on hand????

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      Great information and pictures!





      Orlando, FL

    19. #19
      Zac Penn's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by weaselman View Post
      Zac

      How is the progress on the 24" Zakki Sieve?
      Sorry but I have stopped development of the larger Zakki Sieve due to the extra stress exerted on the tops and bottoms of the 24" diameter version. It ended up being over twice the cost of two 16" sieves and wouldn't save that much space.
      Zac Penn.... Not an expert on Pump Testing, no matter what people may think!
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    20. #20
      Zac Penn's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by Kujira Koi View Post
      What are the footprint dimensions for the Zakki Sieve Jr model, including the pipework and valves, please?
      This all depends on how it is installed...

      This simple inline install would take up 24" x 60" of space...
      Name:  Modes of Operation.PNG
Views: 4670
Size:  140.8 KB

      This installation would work if you didn't have the long open space and footprint would be roughly 36" x 36"...
      Name:  Zakki Sieve w Pump 180 Degrees.PNG
Views: 4504
Size:  79.8 KB

      If you have a very large pump and need to flow more than 4500 gph then a double sieve and single pump would work as well...
      Name:  Double Zakki Sieves on a Single Pump.PNG
Views: 4578
Size:  226.3 KB
      Zac Penn.... Not an expert on Pump Testing, no matter what people may think!
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