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  • Results 1 to 13 of 13

    Thread: "Rubberize it" paint on Pond Liner

    1. #1
      birdman's Avatar
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      "Rubberize it" paint on Pond Liner

      "Rubberize it" is a thin water based rubber coating. Which means NO FUMES! Which is really nice when working in the bottom of a deep pond. Because it's thin, it penetrates all the pours of block or concrete for super adhesion. It can be applied with brush, roller, or sprayed. The only draw back is it takes several coats to get the desired 60 to 80 mill finished thickness.

      This stuff is pretty amazing. 1st picture is a 80 mill sample. And some pictures of how well this will stretch with out pulling apart.

      "Rubberize it" is fish safe, in fact it is safe for potable drinking water systems. It comes in 2 and 5 gallon buckets, and 55 gallon barrels. Coverage is 20 to 25 sq feet per gallon. Most of us would want the 5 gallon buckets which sells for $209 a bucket. So figuring 100 sq feet coverage per bucket that works out to a little over 2 bucks a sq foot. Pretty good.
      Attached Images Attached Images     

    2. #2
      tombmatt is offline Junior Member
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      do you have the 2 gallon buckets and if so how much?

      Thanks Tom

    3. #3
      Teri is offline Junior Member
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      Hi there
      I am new to the forum and I'm trying to figure out how to reply and talk with people, so please forgive me if I get things a bit messed up.

      I saw your pictures of the rubberizeit product and wondered about your current thoughts.
      I have a concrete pond that I poured in 2 sections (bottom and walls) so I have a definate seam line between the two and the pour was very rough. I intend to use the Rubberize-it reinforcement cloth over the seams and over the rough areas and then coat the entire pond with their roll on product.

      I would love any thoughts or comments.
      Thanks
      Teri

    4. #4
      birdman's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by Teri View Post
      Hi there
      I am new to the forum and I'm trying to figure out how to reply and talk with people, so please forgive me if I get things a bit messed up.

      I saw your pictures of the rubberizeit product and wondered about your current thoughts.
      I have a concrete pond that I poured in 2 sections (bottom and walls) so I have a definate seam line between the two and the pour was very rough. I intend to use the Rubberize-it reinforcement cloth over the seams and over the rough areas and then coat the entire pond with their roll on product.

      I would love any thoughts or comments.
      Thanks
      Teri
      Yes, we use the tape along the seams between coats of Rubberiziet. Please give me a call and I can talk you through the process. 541-408-3317

    5. #5
      GPFONTAN is offline Member
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      Five gallons 100 sq. ft. How thick? Trying to figure out how much I would need for a 10000 gallons pond?

    6. #6
      birdman's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by GPFONTAN View Post
      Five gallons 100 sq. ft. How thick? Trying to figure out how much I would need for a 10000 gallons pond?
      PM sent

    7. #7
      Jetmek's Avatar
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      Hi,
      I see this is a old post, how do you feel about Rubberiziet today? I plan on building with concrete block.
      Doug


      " If a cluttered desk is sign of a cluttered mind, of what, then is an empty desk a sign?"
      Albert Einstein

    8. #8
      montwila's Avatar
      montwila is offline Supporting Member ~ Koi Health Care Committee Member
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    9. #9
      birdman's Avatar
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      While I can quote several great success stories, like my own pond which is holding up well, I also know of a couple nightmares. Probable due to incorrect prep or installation. But not being there or doing the installation myself I can't say what went wrong. I am no longer selling Rubberiziet as I just don't like products that are not fool proof for the average DIY-er.
      One option is to have Rubberiziet do the installation for you. They can come down and spray it for you for quite a bit less than Polyurea and you get their guarantee.

    10. #10
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      I agree with Steve here, when applying a rubber type coating on the interior of a pond, the prep work is paramount to the success of any product. If an individual attempts to DIY any of these products, and doesn't perform a THOROUGH job of prepping, the cost of the coating will become a waste of time, effort and money! Not just the initial costs, but later, down the road as the product doesn't properly adhere and begins to delaminate due to constant offgassing of the concrete substrate. This will cause gas bubbles to form and eventually pop, causing the delamination. Then, the pond inhabitants need to be removed, the pond drained and dried for several days, depending on seasonal weather, then the material would be to be completely stripped/removed to allow for another product to be applied. Now the original cost of the project is greatly increased, usually 2 to 4 times the original amount!

      All this can be avoided in a concrete pond construction by simply adding Xypex Admix to the gunite/shotrcrete and coating the interior with one or two coats of Xypex Concentrate. Very little prep work is necessary, comparatively, which reduces cost, and any DIYer with any common sense can apply the product easily with exceptional results. Of course, as Monte discovered, making sure the concrete crew gets a really good skim finish on the interior walls will greatly aid in reducing the amount of time needed to grind the excess material to a smoother finish. Anything near 40-60 grit sandpaper finish is considered ideal, but the smoother the better. We've actually found that if you leave a bit of a "tooth" to the concrete, the material holds much better and absorbs into the substrate more easily. Also, the cost of the material for both the Admix and the Concentrate is closer to roughly $2-$2.50/sq ft if not less. The amount of Admix needed figures to roughly 10-12lbs per cu yd of concrete material and the Concentrate formula covers roughly 250-300sq ft per 60gal container. The material cost translates to roughly $4/lb.

      Taking a pond of, rectangular shape, at 10'x20'x5' deep, and a average pour of 6" thick concrete would equate to roughly 20yds of material. This would need 200-240lbs of Xypex Admix at a cost of roughly $800 - $960 plus the cost of the Xypex Concentrate, which would cost an additional $$480 for a single coating of the interior of the pond. (this would be all that is necessary when the Xypex Admix is used throughout the concrete mix. So, for total cost of $1280 - $1440, you would have a pond that would remain sealed from both the interior as well as the exterior to eliminate ground water from penetrating the concrete shell from the outside, as well as waterproofing from the inside. None of the ponds we've built over the last 6 years, since beginning to use this material has developed a leak. If you can paint a house wall, you can apply the Xypex concentrate to the pond walls.

      One additional thing I've noticed/discovered early on is that when a pond is shot in gunite, mostly by pool builders, they always want to carve out areas around any pipe penetrations roughly 1 1/2"-2" deep. You can see this in Monte's shell around all the tprs. We tell the installers NOT to do this before they begin the shoot, and keep an eye on them as they're doing it to make sure they don't forget. We also don't feel there's a need for "flanges" on these fittings.
      Simply extend the pipe roughly 12" further than the desired thickness of the wall. Make double sure the installers spray the gunite from all directions, especially from underneath the pipes to make sure a proper amount of gunite is applied to create a proper seal. You don't want to have to do what Monte did on that one leaking tpr! Later, when cleaning up the surface with a grinder, simply cut off the pipe extensions and grind them down to be smooth with the wall

      Once this stage is complete, go back in and, using a mix of water/muriatic acid in a sprayer, give the entire surface a thorough cleaning to remove any efllourescence and dirt/dust. Then, mix up the Xypex Concentrate, add a high concentrate black dye powder to the mix to achieve a very black coloring, and, using an 8" wallpaper type brush, begin painting on the Xypex. I find it very useful to keep a hose with a fine mist spray handy and slightly mist the walls as you go. This allow a much smoother application of the Xypex and will allow the material to be soaked into the concrete much more efficiently. That's it!
      Last edited by koiman1950; 01-15-2015 at 08:06 PM.
      Mike

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    11. #11
      BWG is offline Senior Member
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      A very high number of failures are from negative water pressure coming through the wall during or immediately after coating. Many photos have been posted with people coating walls or floors and active damp spots from water migrating through the concrete. Not only should the surface be prepped the exterior of the structure should have some type of moisture barrier and drainage that will keep the outside dry. Very few people provide this drainage and for this reason this is not a good DIY product. The product works well when it only has to deal with pressure from one direction created by water in the pond. This is a good product that I have seen used many times for industrial uses.

      I have a friend with multiple DIY large plywood aquariums over 10 years old in his basement coated with this product.
      Last edited by BWG; 01-16-2015 at 12:13 AM.

    12. #12
      mafraley is offline Junior Member
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      Steve, I've read what seems to be the whole thread and I see I will need to find a local source. I like the idea of having them spray the application but I don't want to rely on a dealer for tough questions. Is your pond still going well with it? Does it hold up to things like setting pots on the bottom or wrapped cinder blocks, which we use to elevate our pumps? My liner needs replacing and I don't know what to expect out of the cinder block tank that is under it. I'm hoping they can seal or tape any cracks in the blocks or mortar.

    13. #13
      birdman's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by mafraley View Post
      Steve, I've read what seems to be the whole thread and I see I will need to find a local source. I like the idea of having them spray the application but I don't want to rely on a dealer for tough questions. Is your pond still going well with it? Does it hold up to things like setting pots on the bottom or wrapped cinder blocks, which we use to elevate our pumps? My liner needs replacing and I don't know what to expect out of the cinder block tank that is under it. I'm hoping they can seal or tape any cracks in the blocks or mortar.
      As of 3 years ago it was holding up well. But we've sold the house and ponds so I don't know.

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